How to deal with window in shower

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by gofer, May 17, 2011.

  1. May 17, 2011 #1

    gofer

    gofer

    gofer

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    I'd like convert our tub to tub and shower by having walls tiled for shower, plumbing put in for shower. My problem is there is a 36"x24" window on a shower wall and it kills my (low) budget to remove it. Any suggestions on what to do?
    If you know of any other forums, that would be great too.

    Thankshttp://www.houserepairtalk.com/images/smilies/confused.gif

    bath1.jpg
     
  2. May 17, 2011 #2
    Can you just leave it? Is there a reason you don't want a window?
     
  3. May 18, 2011 #3

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Hopefully you plan to take down drywall and put up backerboard and all that stuff. If you have vynel window take the sill off replace it with backerboard with a spacer at the window so you have a 5 degree slope out. When you tile, stop the tile 1/8" away from window and fill that with silicon. Check and repair silicon monthly for the rest of you life. If your window is wood or?, do all of the above and have glass outfit install a tempured glass plug for the hole window. Don't forget to upgrade the fan.
     
  4. May 18, 2011 #4

    joecaption

    joecaption

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    It's never a good Idea to have a window in a shower. It will jusy be one more way for water to get into the wall, and will stay mildowed up unless you wipe it down every time someone takes a shower.
    If you have vinyl siding it's pretty easy to remove and repair and only cost about $50.00 for materials.
     
  5. May 18, 2011 #5

    CharlieO

    CharlieO

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    It is best to take the window out to avoid future issues but, it looks like a vinyl window in your pic.
    As Neal suggested, install a peice of backed board under the sill, I would put backer board all the way around the inside of the window and caulk it. then install a mable sill with thinset on a slight pitch out then tile up the sides and across the top with bullnose tile to meet your wall tile, caulk along the window and check caulk regularly.
     
  6. May 18, 2011 #6

    gofer

    gofer

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    Sorry for not providing more detail. The window is vinyl, I did plan remove the drytwall to install cement back board for tiling. My concern is that some water will be running down and out the weep holes of the window. Our exterior is stucco and I don't want to mess with that.

    Any ideas for a barrier? One person suggested using a pressure rod inside the window and taking a shower curtain and cutting it to size. I don't care for that own.
    Another person suggested fabricating some plastic windows, kind of like a second set of windows. Tap plastics is really good about doing custom things like that.
     
  7. Jun 1, 2011 #7

    janellelk

    janellelk

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    Wow, my sweetheart and I just moved into an apartment with a shower/bath window. It has driven us nuts!

    Ultimately we decided to do the pressure rod and cutting a shower curtain route. It doesn't look bad and it really protects the woodwork. Of course I would be thrilled to not have it in there but we couldn't do any permanent alterations nor did we want to invest a lot of money into the project.

    It is what it is. Best of luck!
     
  8. Jun 1, 2011 #8

    nswef

    nswef

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    I just made a curtain out of a tightly woven nylon. It covers the window and a bit of the surround. The trim around the window is wood, painted. We've had it 30 years and no real problems. I do check it every week or so for damp and mildew.
     

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