How to Fix Sagging Ceiling

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asuhayda

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The ceilings in my kitchen and mudroom are really strange. I'm not sure what they're made of or what, if anything is underneath them. My house was built in 1923 so it's 100 years old. Anyways, the ceiling in the mudroom are starting to sag. When I push on them they are very hard to try and push all the way back up where they should be. Any ideas how to get them up again and what to use to fasten them that won't stick out and be so obvious?
Mudroom ceiling.jpg Mudroom Ceilinb 2.jpg
 

tomtheelder2020

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I am surprised you have not had responses to this post. You might try reposting. You could also try DIYChatRoom.com. If you have no other options, consider the following.

I don't have much relevant experience (where I live, the only to possibilities are drywall and wood paneling) but I recommend you try to figure out what the ceiling is made of. If there is attic space above, see if you can get a look from above. It might give you an idea what the material is, and possibly why it is sagging. Scratching a SMALL hole through the surface (from above or below) should tell if you have drywall, paneling, or something else. If it is some kind of paneling you should be able to nail it into place. If drywall, you should use drywall screws, being very careful the screws do not break through the surface paper (your hardware store will have a driver attachment for your drill that will do that). If the material is something else, you need advice from someone other than me (actually, you need that anyway but no one else has responded). You will need a stud sensor to determine where to place nails/screws. For either, you will need to push it into place before securing. Something like using a car jack to push up a "T" made from 2x4s, with the cross piece at least 48" wide, should do it. Based on what you saw from the attic or using the stud sensor, be sure your T is perpendicular to the studs; if parallel you could do serious damage. Drywall and paneling normally come in 48" wide sheets so pushing up one but not an adjoining sheet would likely cause a crack between the two, so proceed cautiously and watch closely. With either, you will need to patch the nail/screw holes.

Was the ceiling sagging when you bought the house or is this new? Especially if new, this could be a very serious issue and you should get immediate, qualified help. Personally, I would call a professional drywall company but I would think a handyman service should be able to tackle this. Also consider hiring a home inspection. They are typically done at the time the house is sold and would give you a lot if info about the condition of your house, what other repairs might be needed that are not apparent to you, and what priority to give them. The inspectors opinion about the ceiling would be gravy.
 

bud16415

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For some reason I missed your post as well.



Have you resolved the issue?



In these old homes people did all kinds of repairs and basically did what they had to do to make it look best they could.



My guess is you have a plaster ceiling above that and it had some cracks or even places missing spots and had likely been wallpapered and or painted at some point. In the 60s the craze as I like to say was Marlite and Mirrors. It looks like some kind of a sheet good like Marlite likely held up with some kind of liquid nails that has let loose over the years.



Honestly what I would do is rip it down and see what’s above. Keep in mind it has to look worse to look better, so don’t start the project until you are ready to tackle it.



Once it is down if the ceiling is fairly level and flat you can put .5 drywall over it and finish it. If it has real issues you can put up furring strips 16” on center screwing thru the plaster and into joists and then go with the drywall. I did this to my whole 1870 home. It is a bit of a job but one a DIYer and a helper can do.
 

bud16415

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I don't even know what Marlite is so my advice is - listen to Bud.
If you were a child of the 60’s every house on the block was finished off with Marlite and mirrors in some modern space aged rec room, bathroom, or laundry. It was 4x8 hardboard panels with bulletproof modern plastic on one side. Popular was white with gold and gray swirls that looked like marble (kind of), but you could get all different versions and colors. Stick on mirror tiles went with it like peas and carrots. Most of it got painted at some point rather than pull it down to try and make it look more 80’s.



Marlite Friday Feature

marlite1.JPG marlite2.JPG marlite3.JPG
 

Sparky617

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It definitely looks like some sheet good like Marlite or paneling. For a quick fix you could go attach 1x2 wood across the ceiling tying them into the joists and pulling up the sag. For me that would be a short term, low mess solution. Long term I agree with Bud, but it will be a mess doing it and will likely lead to a much bigger project (while we're at it we might as well...) than you started out doing.
 

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