How to use a HAMMER Drill

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dwtjan

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I am a 70-year-old female with NO concrete experience. I am installing rubber "curbs" in my driveway that need to be bolted down. I went to Home Depot and they helped with the hardware to use. They suggested I get a hammer drill. I said I wasn't about to spend more money on the hammer drill than I did on the curbs. They said it was possible to use my regular drill but I would be at it for hours and may ruin my drill. I finally made it through about 1/4". I decided to go get a hammer drill. Ha! Knowing I would not be using it for much concrete drilling if any, I decided to get a cheap one. I went to Harbor Freight and purchased the Bauer 1792C-B1 20V HyperMax Lithium 1/2" compact hammer drill kit for $69.99. I will say I believe it will succeed in hammering the four 3/16" holes, about 2" deep. I also believe if I knew what I was doing it would go smoother. Easier. Faster. I have made a hole an inch or so deep. The battery keeps coming off. The vibration is massive. The torque selector goes from 1 to 21. I have NO idea how to use this or how to tell if it needs adjusting when I am drilling. The directions suck big-time! Even if they wrote them with experienced users in mind, instead of someone that knows nothing, they are still inadequate. I put it on the fast speed. I always thought that switch was a torque setting. From what I'm gathering, it is just a fast and slow switch. Putting it on slow seems to do nothing. Can someone please explain the actual 1-21 torque ring and how to use it? Does it have anything to do with the vibration? I believe the battery is vibrating right off! It has disconnected several times while hammering. If I can figure this out to where it is not such a pain, I just might find more concrete to drill and larger capacity batteries! I read where a 2" deep hole should take about a minute. That would be outstanding! Not that I expect that. I'd just like to get this done without taking hours! Thanks!
 

Snoonyb

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Welcome.
There is a learning curve

As an example, torque is an effort at overcoming a resistance. So, when you turn a door knob, and it releases the door from it's captured position, easily, little torque was required, however, when the door is securely captured and the latching device requires more torque to cause it's release, you've expended more effort.

So, the drill bit spins, and on the 1 setting, the pressure you are exerting in drilling, will quickly stop the drill bit from spinning, so, increasing the torque setting, will cause the drill bit to continue, it's intended use.

The battery dislodging can be overcome by applying duct tape.

The learning curve, is you using and becoming comfortable with the tool.

Also HD rents roto-hammers.

Mine is a BOSCH, SDS, 120v.
 

dwtjan

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I looked into renting a drill and did not like the idea. Felt it was a waste of money. Especially since I did have the money to buy one. As far as duct taping the battery on....maybe until the last curb is installed. I don't feel a new drill should have such a flaw. I'll either get my money back or exchange it for one that works as it should. I understand what you're saying re the learning curve. Honestly, I doubt the four holes I'm working on for this project are going to be sufficient to accomplish that. I don't see using the hammer drill for concrete as something I will be doing. This is a first for me and I'm 70! At least I can use the drill as a straight drill so it won't be a total waste. Thanks for explaining torque. It helps to understand all you can. I was told on my hammer drill, the torque ring was only for the 'screwdriver' part. NOT the hammer drill mode or the drilling mode. They said the drilling mode does not need torque. It's automatic. Just the middle mode. (Three modes: hammer drill, fastening-screwing, drilling. Thanks for taking the time to not only read my post but for responding as well. Thanks!!
 

Guzzle

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I wouldn't buy HF but I did inherit a HF chopsaw. I'm waiting for it to fail such that the blade comes off & causes me a massive blood loss.

"If crews need the equipment regularly enough over its estimated useful life to pay back the cost of not owning it, the case to purchase probably is strong. If renting the piece of equipment will cost as much or more than owning it, then it makes sense to buy it, get the benefit and save the incremental cost."

Rent a good one to inform yourself & then buy later if you want.

There's a saying that cheap stuff is expensive [in the long run] & expensive stuff is cheap [in the long run].

I use a star drill & a large hammer. & goggles.
 
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havasu

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Can you go to a rental yard and rent a Hilti hammer drill? My Hinti can drill thru a 4" slab in less than 15 seconds.
 

dwtjan

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Thanks, everyone! But I am done! Just finished the 4 holes and installed the curbs. Believe me, Harbor Freight is not the place to purchase a quality power tool, unless it is a name brand. I knew that. I couldn't see wasting money renting and as I only had 4 holes 3/16 x 2" to drill, I figured this one would get the job done better than a regular drill. And it did. As it has the problem of the battery vibrating completely off, I have no guilt in taking it back and getting my money back! Thanks again. I learned a lot.
 

ekrig

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I would have taken a similar approach to what you did. If one has a very small project and needs a tool that might never use again, between renting a tool and buying a cheap tool for the same amount of money, I usually go for the latter because then I have the tool should I even need it again.

All that said, I would not have a bought a cordless tool for these purposes. Cheap corded hammer drills can be had for ~$40, and they should have more power than the cordless ones. If it breaks during this task, take it back and get another...
 

Guzzle

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Unlike everyone else, HF does not always publish the power draw of their elec. motors.
The more amps a tool draws, the more horsepower, the quicker the job, the less effort on your part.

And at The HD, higher price does not always mean higher amps. Price depends on demand, not necessarily on quality or anything else.
 

billshack

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I worked as a plumber for 30 years. I liked a metabo
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Metabo SBE 750 Hammer Drill The SBE 750 has a 159-in.-lb. maximum tightening torque, enabling it to be used for heavy-duty drilling in wood, concrete block, brick, solid concrete and steel. 3/4-in. capacity in concrete, 1/2 in. in mild steel and 1 1/2 in. in softwood 6.2-amp motor "Goose neck" depth gauge Variospeed full-wave electronic speed control Proprietary S-automatic safety clutch.

the clutch will save your life. cost a lot but well worth it
 

dwtjan

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Thank you very much for your input. Well, I finished the project of four small holes
yesterday. As the battery kept vibrating off, I have no qualms re taking it back and
getting a refund! Thanks again!
 

BuzzLOL

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I wouldn't buy HF but I did inherit a HF chopsaw. I'm waiting for it to fail such that the blade comes off & causes me a massive blood loss.
A few years ago bought a $19.95 HF sawsall type saw... used it lightly 3 times and it fell apart inside... took it apart and put everything back together tighter... used it lightly 2 more times and it broke completely in half... still haven't gotten around to fixing that... bought a Milwaukee SawsAll, but the Democrat burglars stole that... grabbed another $19.95 HF sawsall and it seemed a little loose because the body of this new style one swivels to different locked angles, but used it to saw some cast iron and it seemed to hold up fine... seems to be a vast improvement over the earlier design, a little heavier, better quality plastic in the plastic half... may not be $19.95 any more, most stuff at HF seems to have jumped up 50% in price now vs a few months ago... the $99.95 3 Ton low profile floor jack I bought early 2021 goes on sale for $149.95 now...
 

BuzzLOL

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The more amps a tool draws, the more horsepower, the quicker the job, the less effort on your part.
Depends on the efficiency of the motor... some low priced motors use more amps, but don't have more HP...
 

Guzzle

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Metabo SBE 750 Hammer Drill The SBE 750 has a 159-in.-lb. maximum tightening torque, enabling it to be used for heavy-duty drilling in wood, concrete block, brick, solid concrete and steel. 3/4-in. capacity in concrete, 1/2 in. in mild steel and 1 1/2 in. in softwood 6.2-amp motor "Goose neck" depth gauge Variospeed full-wave electronic speed control Proprietary S-automatic safety clutch.

the clutch will save your life. cost a lot but well worth it

If it's 120v, it's 1 horsepower, if 240v it's 2. I think these Euro OEMs sometimes have to change their design to meet US standards.
 

dwtjan

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Thanks again, but at 70, I doubt I'll be needing to drill into cement from now on! If I do, I'll take these suggestions then make my decision! Thank you all!
 

Eddie_T

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Thanks again, but at 70, I doubt I'll be needing to drill into cement from now on! If I do, I'll take these suggestions then make my decision! Thank you all!
Hey it happens! People tend to just keep on posting after a problem is solved.
 

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