how would I fix this? pic included

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voam

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I have a leak where this 2" pipe cracked where the red line is drawn. How would I repair this? Could I just cut about a foot above the crack and replace the section? Is that T-shaped joint still OK? Would I be able to remove the part of the pipe that that is still in the T shaped joint or once these things set is it impossible to clear out? I have never worked with piping before so although it looks somewhat simple in how to videos I know appearances can be deceiving.



Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

gatorfan

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Could I just cut about a foot above the crack and replace the section? Is that T-shaped joint still OK? Would I be able to remove the part of the pipe that that is still in the T shaped joint or once these things set is it impossible to clear out?
Nope, the fittings are permanently glued together. Since the fittings are so close together, you'll need to replace the entire assembly. It may seem like a lot, but it's just a sanitary tee, two street 90s and a regular 90. You'll also need to get a length of pipe, ABS cement, a repair coupling, and 1-2 regular couplings.

Make sure you fit everything together before you start gluing. Also make sure you plan out the order of assembly so you can get the last fitting installed without "painting yourself in a corner." The repair coupling will make it easy, but they're a little more expensive than a regular fitting, so if you can work out a way to avoid it you'll save a few $s.

BTW, I would make the horizontal section as long as you can get to fit. The existing is pretty close to an s-trap which is not allowed since it's easy for it to get sucked dry.

Matt
 

Redwood

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Hi Voam,
You would cut it out and put in a new tee, trap, and standpipe. If you can find the black ABS pipe you can cement it in using a coupling on the bottom then use a banded coupling such as a Fernco Proflex on the top. Repair couplings have a nasty habit of setting up to quickly especially with ABS and causing problems.

However, in your area I anticipate ABS being hard to find and white PVC pipe is much more common. PVC and ABS cannot be cemented together so if you make up the new section in PVC I would use a banded coupling such as the Fernco Proflex on both the top and bottom of the repair to attach it.

One other item of interest is the white pipe coming into the wye at the botto near the floor. What is it and can you post another picture showing more of it?

Is this line coming down from the kitchen sink above?
 

voam

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Thank you for the detailed replies. The white line is from the heater air conditioning unit. I think it is the from the condenser from the AC. (not 100% sure about that, but definitely from heater /ac unit).
 

Redwood

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That may be problematic as well...

Do you get nasty sewer smells in your home during the winter months?
 

voam

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No we don't. But you do raise a disturbing point.
 

kok328

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I'd be interested to see what a bead of silicone would do for the problem before "opening a can of worms".
 

Redwood

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I'd be interested to see what a bead of silicone would do for the problem before "opening a can of worms".
Not much and a very nasty mess if the cracking continues which it will...
 

Redwood

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No we don't. But you do raise a disturbing point.
The line is incorrectly tied in and I'm surprised you are not getting sewer gases drawn into your HVAC system...
 

murph52

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I don't think the hub flex coupling will work since the crack is right at the fitting. That coupling can only join pipe to pipe (not pipe to a pipe fitting).
 

Toadfish

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I don't think the hub flex coupling will work since the crack is right at the fitting. That coupling can only join pipe to pipe (not pipe to a pipe fitting).
No you are wrong.
There's more than enough flex in the coupling to ensure a water tight seal. We are talking drain lines not water under pressure. While this is not the greatest fix it sounds like something the homeowner can handle.
The proper way would be to replace the whole assembly or drill out the broken pipe section and replace.
 

kok328

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Redwood

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Oh Boy...

A plain neoprene coupling...
Not exactly what I would recommend....

Stick with the banded coupling that I mentioned earlier...
The additional support from the band will keep the pipes lined up properly so that the line doesn't clog...



The-Coupler.jpg
 

Redwood

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I don't think the hub flex coupling will work since the crack is right at the fitting. That coupling can only join pipe to pipe (not pipe to a pipe fitting).
No you are wrong.
There's more than enough flex in the coupling to ensure a water tight seal. We are talking drain lines not water under pressure. While this is not the greatest fix it sounds like something the homeowner can handle.
The proper way would be to replace the whole assembly or drill out the broken pipe section and replace.
No Toadfish you are wrong...:eek:

Murph52 is correct the couplings are designed for pipe to pipe connections only and that is the only approved use under code....:rolleyes:
 

Toadfish

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No Toadfish you are wrong...:eek:

Murph52 is correct the couplings are designed for pipe to pipe connections only and that is the only approved use under code....:rolleyes:
yea ok, The home owner is calling the inspector now for approval. :rolleyes: :rofl:
 

Redwood

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Hackitty Hackitty Hack Hack Hack....

Why does my drain keep plugging up?

Could it be this 50% offset at the joint with the Fernco?

There is a reason for the plumbing code....
It is the minimum acceptable standard.....
Plumbing should work.... Right?
 

gatorfan

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Seems like replacing this assembly isn't that much harder or more expensive than using one of these couplings, and it is a nice, relatively simple, first project since it's just replacing what's already there. Replacing the assembly would also possibly give the OP the chance to convert that existing s-trap into a p-trap-- that's a bigger siphon concern to me than the (future) a/c trap.

For the a/c, as long as it's a 2" p-trap I think it should be safe from siphoning. The catch is joining abs and pvc. If it were me, I'd set it up as an air gap drain (like a washing machine drain): build in a trap between the wye and a new 12" vertical 2" drain. Then just sleeve a few inches of pvc in the top of the abs, eliminating the need for a reducer and any cementing. The only (tiny) concern in my mind would be that the trap would evaporate dry in the winter.

Matt
 

Johnboy555

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They make a tool now that is designed to drill out the pipe from a cemented joint. I'm pretty sure it's called a "Hub Saver" but go in to any plumbing supply house, not the big box stores, and they should have one. I've used it and it's saved me a lot of time and work. Cut the vertical pipe about 2' above the crack, and directly above the hub of the fitting. Use the Hub Saver as directed...make sure to hold the drill in a VERY straight line to the hub. Glue a new 2" piece of pipe into the hub and install a using a Fernco or repair union (connector) at the top.
 
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