Installing new pvc from meter?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum' started by StevenC, Jun 30, 2010.

  1. Jun 30, 2010 #1

    StevenC

    StevenC

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    I'm installing new pvc in my house and have taken out all of the old galvanized pipes. I would like to replace everything back to the meter with new pvc. How difficult is it connecting to the meter? Or can I use a compression fitting (not sure if thats the right term) to connect the gal. to the pvc about 8ft from the foundation? I have about 25ft to the meter. I would rather not connect to the gal. with the fitting but I don't want to get the city involved either.
     
  2. Jun 30, 2010 #2

    Redwood

    Redwood

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    Lets talk a little bit about your badly flawed plan to install PVC water lines in your home...:eek:

    Under most codes PVC can only be used for water supply outside the foundation underground...

    It can also never be used on hot water...

    This leaves you with acceptable replacement materials of copper, PEX, CPVC to choose from.
     
  3. Jun 30, 2010 #3

    StevenC

    StevenC

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    So your saying, once it reaches the foundation it has to be another material even if its for cold water?
     
  4. Jun 30, 2010 #4

    StevenC

    StevenC

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    Or are you saying to use pvc only for cold water throughout the house and Cpvc for the hot water? I'm aware but didn't specify.
     
  5. Jul 1, 2010 #5

    Redwood

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    This means that you convert to another material and enter the house.
    It is not allowed inside.

    Again I say under most codes check your locally used code.

    But even if allowed I wouldn't recommend it.
     
  6. Jul 1, 2010 #6

    StevenC

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    Ok I see, so how would you recommend connecting Cpvc to the galvanized outside the house?
    Thanks
     
  7. Jul 2, 2010 #7

    Redwood

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    I would use the appropriate transition adapter with brass threads. I would not use plastic threads anywhere.

    I really am no expert on CPVC I seldom use it...

    Around here it is the material of choice for hacks and I can truthfully say I can count the number of professionally done CPVC installations I have seen in my entire career on my fingers...

    I do however use copper and PEX.

    cpvc-metal-male-adapter.jpg

    cpvc-metal-female-adapter.jpg
     
  8. Aug 26, 2011 #8

    adam_withrow

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    go with copper, man. once you get the hang of it, it is super easy.
     
  9. Aug 27, 2011 #9

    BridgeMan

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    Just don't burn the house down with the torch (don't laugh, I've seen and heard of it being done plenty, especially if you're not skilled at sweating the joints and fittings). If I had to decide what to use to re-plumb the place we're in, I think I'd be tempted to use Pex--I like the way you can (gently) curve the stuff, and it's highly resistant to pressure surges or the occasional cold weather, frozen pipe thing.
     
  10. Aug 27, 2011 #10

    Redwood

    Redwood

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    And in some places like Central Florida for instance your copper pipes will be getting replaced in 5 - 15 years....

    Simply said you should use the best possible pipe material for the water conditions in your area.
     

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