Installing sump pump

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum' started by Dagwud, Mar 12, 2011.

  1. Mar 12, 2011 #1

    Dagwud

    Dagwud

    Dagwud

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    I will be installing a sump pump in an old farm house that has a drain in the basement that dumps into an old drainage field tile. The house has two seperate basements sperated by a crawl space. The newer basement built during an addition 30 years ago already has a sump pump that using a plastic water line going into the tile drain in the old basement and works good. The old basement needs a sump as well and I would like to place a valve in the dischage line so I can alter the flow of water if I choose.

    The problem is the tile line works well and is legal to use for the sump pumps but in cases of very heavy rains the ground will become so saturated that the tile line can not keep up causing the old basement to flood. I would like to have the new sump pump in the old basement also dump into the tile but also have a valve in the PVC discharge line so I can divert the water during times of very heavy rains so the water will then exit the basement wall above ground and connect to a flexible hose that will make the water run away from the house down a slight slope to help keep the tile from backing up during those rare 5 or 6 inch rains we get every couple of years.

    Is there any problems using a valve and alternate routing? Do I need to install a check valve above the pump as I see some web "experts" suggesting? The newer basement's sump pump does not use a check valve and its line goes up a good 6 ft before going horizintally through crawl space and then back down to the tile line in old basement and it seems to work just fine.
     
  2. Mar 13, 2011 #2

    kok328

    kok328

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    I don't see any reason why you could not use a valve and alternating route although, both pumps should have a check valve installed.
     
  3. May 4, 2011 #3

    JImprovements

    JImprovements

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    I'm not a web "expert", but don't see any problem as well..
     
  4. May 4, 2011 #4

    Blue Jay

    Blue Jay

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    If you are going to use the same above grade discharge line for both pumps YES you will want a check valve on both pumps. If you don't then unless both pumps are running at the same time you will just pump water to the other pit which would just de-feet the purpose.
     
  5. May 5, 2011 #5

    joecaption

    joecaption

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    The reason the check valve is there is to stop the water from running back down into the pit when the pump shuts off and just filling it back up.
     
  6. Jun 1, 2011 #6

    ConcreteTreat

    ConcreteTreat

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    The answer may be as simple as installing a second some pump in each of the areas. Even with very powerful sump pump systems, it's possible and likely that during extreme conditions you will need two to keep the space dry. Alternatively, you can install a second discharge line and a "secondary" sump pump in the same pit, with a higher float switch that will cause it to only turn on when the water is overwhelming the primary pump.

    Redundancy in a waterproofing system is a good idea even when there isn't a gigantic flood in your basement. When the primary pump fails -- and it will fail -- you have another one ready.

    If water is coming up everywhere through the floor, you may want to place some delta drainage matting along the floor. This will keep you and your stuff high and dry, while the water is directed to your drain system.

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    Gale
    Concrete Treat: Concrete Sealer
     

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