is there hope?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum' started by daniel2229, May 7, 2008.

  1. May 7, 2008 #1

    daniel2229

    daniel2229

    daniel2229

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    Is there any hope of moving these pipes up through the floor joists?

    Would sisters against the joists be necessary if a hole is drilled through the joists?

    Thanks!

    Picture 005.jpg

    pipes-2.jpg
     
  2. May 7, 2008 #2

    thebobo

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    That's a lot of elbows with no cleanouts; hope no liquids go down that line. Looks like you would be ok, but it's hard to tell how deep those joists are. General rule is holes should be no larger than 1/3 of joist depth, so with 2x8 joists, the holes can be 2 1/2", with 2x10 joists they can be 3 1/8". Keep the holes centered in the joist.
     
  3. May 7, 2008 #3

    handyguys

    handyguys

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    What thebobo said regarding holes. I wouldn't worry about cleanouts or "liquids". This isn't likely a vent, its most likely for liquids.

    The hard part of the project will be matching the ceiling texture!
     
  4. May 7, 2008 #4

    daniel2229

    daniel2229

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    The pipe running horizontally is the drain pipe from my wife's half of the bathroom sink upstairs. The vertical pipe running behind it is the drain pipe leading from my sink.

    Why they were not united when the house was built is anybody's guess. All work done by licensed plumbers and passing building inspections, so what was I to know?
     
  5. May 7, 2008 #5

    handyguys

    handyguys

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    Thats interesting. That could mean one pipe is a vent and one is a drain. If they are both drains, and both vented. IF, if, if... They the might be able to be combined under the sink and the one in your way of removing the soffit removed entirely. Might...Cant say for sure from here.
     
  6. May 7, 2008 #6

    daniel2229

    daniel2229

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    I guess I can figure out whether water runs through this pipe by running hot water through it for a few minutes.

    My idea is to remove the blacked out area of the photo as it is not a load bearing surface. That will give me room to get my hand back behind the floor joist to make the glue-ups and connections. The rest of the drain will go through the joists as suggested.

    joist-photo.jpg
     
  7. May 8, 2008 #7

    daniel2229

    daniel2229

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    Well, I have a plumber coming to look at the job in a few minutes; I hope it goes OK. We had two plumbers say no to the job without even coming out to look at it. One said he had done a job just like it, and the customer complained that his floor sagged later.

    What is a good ballpark figure for a job like this?

    That's not good news for me. We are committed to this now.

    If for some reason I have to do this job myself, should I cut the holes for the pipes then dry fit them together before starting to glue up?
     
  8. May 8, 2008 #8

    handyguys

    handyguys

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    What did the plumber say? Did you ask him if you can just eliminate the pipe and combine with the other one?
     
  9. May 8, 2008 #9

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

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    Handyguy's reference is to making a 'continous drain' under the sinks above. Are they in a vanity cabinet? Could the pipe from one to the other be hidden on the upper floor?
    One sink may drain over to the other one's drain, install a trap below the connection and go with the drain to your sink as long as directional fittings are used (which is the only kind made in DWV plastic fittings).
    Glenn
     
  10. May 8, 2008 #10

    handyguys

    handyguys

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    I'm a horrible typist and a werster speller!
     
  11. May 9, 2008 #11

    daniel2229

    daniel2229

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    I ran water in the pipe. It is the drain pipe for both sinks! The pipe in the wall is the vent. And yes, they run under cabinets.

    The plumber that came to give us a quote said that this kind of installation would be typical for a house that had a header. Still waiting for his quote although it has been less than 24 hours.

    Will let you know how it turns out. Photos will follow the finished job.
     
  12. May 19, 2008 #12

    daniel2229

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    Our licensed plumber came this morning and finished the job in about two hours. My wife called and said it looks great.

    Now we are ready for the dry wall guy.

    The cabinets ship from Shenandoah on Thursday of this week. My wife actually sold our cabinets during a community garage sale last Thursday for $1000. Took a 1/3 downpayment and will collect the rest when the cabinets come down.

    I feel like there is actually light at the end of the tunnel!
     
  13. May 25, 2008 #13

    daniel2229

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    The finished product. Well worth the $245, and no leaks!

    rerouted-pipe1.jpg

    rerouted2.jpg
     
  14. Jun 9, 2008 #14

    daniel2229

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    I have removed all the cabinets from the kitchen and had to make some pretty serious cuts to get the sink base out.

    I have the dry wall up and painted. All the hanging cupboards are in place.

    I have the corner base cabinet in place and am ready to place the sink base. However, I don't want to make as drastic a cut as I did to get the old one out.

    So here is my next plumbing question. I would like to remove two of the collars on the piece of drain pipe going into the wall so that only one sticks out of the wall. This will make cutting the sink base a much easier job.

    Is there a way of doing this so the pipe is not destroyed? I would like to remove the collar where the red arrow points.

    The people who are installing our counter tops are also supplying the plumber to put in the sink, disposal, and hook up drain pipes and water supply lines.

    drain-pipe.jpg
     
  15. Jun 9, 2008 #15

    triple D

    triple D

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    If you were to ask me, I would say cut the drywall and get to a part of the pipe you could cut and re-fit the way you want. Its all couplings there and that makes it hard to work with. Someone already hacked that setup by using so many couplings. Good luck, I would say that should cost half as much as the other job.
     
  16. Jun 11, 2008 #16

    daniel2229

    daniel2229

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    I decided to just be really careful cutting out the back of the sink base and leave the plumbing the way it is. I already have so many irons in the fire that I don't need one more job.

    The cuts look OK, even to my wife! Let's face it; if she approves, it must be OK.

    The project is really coming together now. Only one more piece to install. Then the counter people come to measure.
     
  17. Jun 11, 2008 #17

    daniel2229

    daniel2229

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    I also decided to go with Shark Bite connectors to hook all my supply lines back up. I had a devil of a time soldering a cap on the supply lines when removing the old sink base.

    It took forever to get the water to turned off all the way. I even have a brand new gate valve put in last year. Those lines are the lowest in the house and had to pull all the water out with paper towel. I opened all the faucets upstairs and waited for the flow to subside before wicking out the water. Then used Plumber's Bread to stop up the pipe.

    One side soldered well. The other side had a tiny hole in the back and dripped. So I used some of that miracle putty you see on TV to get the leak stopped.

    Is resoldering those supply lines something that I should expect the plumber who installs the new sink to do? I also have the special drain for the dishwasher and a supply line that feeds the washer to put in.

    Can a really good plumber sweat off pipes that have water in them or will the water absorb away all the heat?
     
  18. Jun 12, 2008 #18

    glennjanie

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    Water in the pipes will limit the temperature and keep them from 'sweating' off, the best thing to do with the is cut them off as near the caps as possible. Your plumber will not think twice about that and the Shark Bite will go right on from there.
    Glenn
     
  19. Aug 5, 2008 #19

    frodo

    frodo

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    i suspect that is it ia a vent from down stairs, i base my assumption, on the fact that there are not any long sweps visable on this line. and that it would not make any sence, to not have tied that horizontal line into the vertical line. unless it is a vent from down stairs.
    this is all guessing, i could be completly wrong
     
  20. Aug 5, 2008 #20

    frodo

    frodo

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    next time you have a problem with water in your pipes,while trying to soliger try this take a bicycle pump, cut the end off the hose. hold it on valve at the washing machine and pump the lines out.
     

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