Is this a load bearing wall?

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Frank

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I had to replace some subfloor underneath my hot water heater because the guy who had the house before me never fixed it and it was rotting.

I had to remove the wall to be able to get behind the hot water heater and fix the sub flooring also.

however when I was pulling the 4-ft wall out it made me start thinking was it load bearing because the nails were driven from the top and not the bottom which makes me think it was built when the house was built.

the short section of wall that I took out runs east and west. The main beam under the house that supports the whole house is built out of 2x8 and there's three of them staggered together but right in the middle I added another 2x8 and staggered it with lag bolts for more support.

The roof trusses and roof joists run east and west. It's a gable roof.

My question is "
was this wall a low bearing wall"?
The pictures are above/below.
 

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kok328

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rule of thumb is that if the wall is running the same direction as the roof trusses, then the wall is not load bearing. However, due to some creative engineering, you might want to pop your head into the attic to see if any modifications have been done.
 

Frank

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rule of thumb is that if the wall is running the same direction as the roof trusses, then the wall is not load bearing. However, due to some creative engineering, you might want to pop your head into the attic to see if any modifications have been done.
What exactly will I be looking for in the attic? The trusses do run east and west the same as the wall runs east and west
 

kok328

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What exactly will I be looking for in the attic? The trusses do run east and west the same as the wall runs east and west
I thought I read that both the trusses and wall ran east to west.
Anyway, if the wall runs parallel to the trusses, it will not be load bearing.
If the wall runs perpendicular to the trusses, then it will be load bearing.
You'll be looking for uniformity in framing, an indication that someone has changed the original engineered design of the truss system.
 

billshack

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In the Canadian building code a bearing wall is made with 2x4 12 inches centre to centre or 2x6 16 inches centre to centre.
 

Frank

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This house was built in the '50s and maybe the '40s and it's built out of 2x3's
 

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