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Kitchen LED-strip Installation

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Junto

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I would like to convert my existing fluorescent lights in my kitchen to under-counter LED strip lighting and can use some help. I have 5-24" fixtures and one 18" unit (near the appliance garage). Please refer to the layout. There are three-way switches to turn these lights on/off from either side of the kitchen. I'm struggling with how to control the new LED lights. I've seen enough YouTube videos to know that I need to wire my 110v power into a transformer to convert to 12v DC. Then, I daisy-chain each of the strips and cut/splice as required. I have several places I can tie into the 110v and hide the transformer; however, how do I control the lights from either side of the kitchen?

From the photos below, you can see the places where it is a bit dark. (Unfortunately, you can see our mess as well.)

Any help would be appreciated, including any suggestions for suppliers.
Rick
 

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Snoonyb

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Is there more to this:"There are three-way switches to turn these lights on/off from either side of the kitchen," or are you asking how you "selectively" control various sections of the lighting?
 

kok328

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The style I installed, the 110V/12DC transformer plugs into a wall outlet. They provide a remote control to turn them on/off from anywhere in the kitchen. They strobe, blink, fade, multi-color, dim, etc.....
Is this an option for you? You'll just abandon the light switches.
 

Junto

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Currently, I have rocker switches at the locations on the drawing marked with an "S". All the fluorescent lights are controlled by each switch. Both switches are three-way switches with the white, black, and red ("traveller") wires. I don't feel the need to control the lights in sections, however, I do like the idea of being able to dim them all at one time. I've seen some LEDs which were rather bright, and I'd like the option to turn them down.

Question: Is it possible to put dimmers on each of those switches and have the output feed the transformer?

Since I initially posted the drawing and pictures, I found a junction box inside the appliance garage above the roll-up door. The 18" fixture in the corner ties into this junction box. There is no red "traveller wire"; there are only two-wire lines going into this junction box (one in to power this fixture, and one out to feed the next fixture). Seems to me that I could remove all the fixtures and rely on this two-wire line to feed a transformer.

Question: Can I splice into this line to power the transformer and have the output of the transformer feed LEDs to the left and feed LEDs to the right? Does the transformer have two outputs? Is there a connector which would allow me to do that?

Thanks again.
Rick
 

Junto

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The style I installed, the 110V/12DC transformer plugs into a wall outlet. They provide a remote control to turn them on/off from anywhere in the kitchen. They strobe, blink, fade, multi-color, dim, etc.....
Is this an option for you? You'll just abandon the light switches.
Thanks for the info. Your install sounds cool, but we're inclined to lose remotes, and since we're trying to sell this place, I'd have a hard time explaining the abandoned switches.
 

Snoonyb

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RE: post #4. The answer is yes to all three and with regard to powering in both directions, from the transformer, wire nuts work, just make sure the transformer is capable of handling the load.
 

Junto

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RE: post #4. The answer is yes to all three and with regard to powering in both directions, from the transformer, wire nuts work, just make sure the transformer is capable of handling the load.
The general impression I have is that these transformers have telephone-type connectors. It's hard for me to wrap my head around that type of transformer and wire nuts. I need to take a look at various types of hardware associated with running the LED-strips. Can you point me in that direction, or recommend manufacturers?

LATER:
Snoonyb... I did a little more Googling and came up with the following which suggests the type of three-way configuration I'd like to do via a Lutron Diva Dimmer switch with a Magnitude Magnetic Dimmable Transformer.


I was a bit surprised to see the romex wiring connected to the output of the transformer, and I now see the transition to the LED wires (with wire nuts).
 
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Burgy

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I would like to convert my existing fluorescent lights in my kitchen to under-counter LED strip lighting and can use some help. I have 5-24" fixtures and one 18" unit (near the appliance garage). Please refer to the layout. There are three-way switches to turn these lights on/off from either side of the kitchen. I'm struggling with how to control the new LED lights. I've seen enough YouTube videos to know that I need to wire my 110v power into a transformer to convert to 12v DC. Then, I daisy-chain each of the strips and cut/splice as required. I have several places I can tie into the 110v and hide the transformer; however, how do I control the lights from either side of the kitchen?

From the photos below, you can see the places where it is a bit dark. (Unfortunately, you can see our mess as well.)

Any help would be appreciated, including any suggestions for suppliers.
Rick
I would like to convert my existing fluorescent lights in my kitchen to under-counter LED strip lighting and can use some help. I have 5-24" fixtures and one 18" unit (near the appliance garage). Please refer to the layout. There are three-way switches to turn these lights on/off from either side of the kitchen. I'm struggling with how to control the new LED lights. I've seen enough YouTube videos to know that I need to wire my 110v power into a transformer to convert to 12v DC. Then, I daisy-chain each of the strips and cut/splice as required. I have several places I can tie into the 110v and hide the transformer; however, how do I control the lights from either side of the kitchen?

From the photos below, you can see the places where it is a bit dark. (Unfortunately, you can see our mess as well.)

Any help would be appreciated, including any suggestions for suppliers.
Rick
I would like to convert my existing fluorescent lights in my kitchen to under-counter LED strip lighting and can use some help. I have 5-24" fixtures and one 18" unit (near the appliance garage). Please refer to the layout. There are three-way switches to turn these lights on/off from either side of the kitchen. I'm struggling with how to control the new LED lights. I've seen enough YouTube videos to know that I need to wire my 110v power into a transformer to convert to 12v DC. Then, I daisy-chain each of the strips and cut/splice as required. I have several places I can tie into the 110v and hide the transformer; however, how do I control the lights from either side of the kitchen?

From the photos below, you can see the places where it is a bit dark. (Unfortunately, you can see our mess as well.)

Any help would be appreciated, including any suggestions for suppliers.
Rick
On a side note Rick, if you have any other fluorescents such as 4' lamps in the garage or other areas, if you want a high quality LED tube to replace those lamps, check out Titanledus.com. 12 year warranty and a 155,000 rating on all their USA (Phoenix, AZ) manufactured LED Lights. I am a rep for them and can help you out. Thanks (t.burgmeier@titanled.net)
 

Johnboy555

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Not sure why you want to go to low voltage and fool around with transformers.
I've installed these direct replacement fixtures in quite a few of my customers kitchens and have not had one complaint. From Amazon, just search. They are dimmable and just require a single dimmer (3 way) installed at either of your 3 way switches.
Hardwired LED Under Cabinet Task Lighting - 16 Watt, 24", Dimmable, CRI>90, 3000K (Warm White), Wide Body, Long Lasting Metal Base with Frost Lens

They even have a installation video. If you're feeling
adventurous!
 
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Junto

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Thanks for the feedback. I was hoping to get something which has a lower profile, hide the fixture, and eliminate the dark sections between the existing fixtures. I reviewed what you suggested, and unless I'm missing something, I would only be replacing one fixture with a different one. Lower operating cost is not the objective.
 

Johnboy555

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Got ya! There are many different types of LED strips that would fit your needs. I have some in my kitchen that are less than 1/2" high X 1 1/2" wide (approx.) dimmable. You could bring the pigtails that run to existing fixtures into the cabinet backs using a "remodel/old" box and outlet for the transformers. You would only need to do that once for each bank of cabinets. The only drawback I see is to be able to dim all lights at the same time. Maybe there is someone out there that KNOWS how to overcome this. When I installed the ones that I mentioned above they are all controlled by the same dimmer. Just maybe there's a transformer that will work like that. I'm an old timer that doesn't know all the "newfangled" stuff out there. But I have a very analytical mind towards problem solving. I just don't know what's new out there.
 

kok328

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Thanks for the info. Your install sounds cool, but we're inclined to lose remotes, and since we're trying to sell this place, I'd have a hard time explaining the abandoned switches.
No worries, I discovered that the Home button on a Roku remote will turn on the LED lights.:oops:
 
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