Leaking roof - Shingles laid correctly?

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Reelsix

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Hi - I have a roof that was installed less than four years ago that is now leaking. Roofer seems to be cooperating and saying they will repair but he is unable to tell the issue.

I am curious if based on the pitch of the roof if the shingles were laid correctly and hoping the forum's expertise can confirm. Center Roof image shows wide shot of roof pitch. Right detail shows the area of the roof that is leaking. Shingle detail shows how the shingles are overlapping.

Thanks for the help with my Money Pit!

*Bonus question - the ridge vents were simply installed over the gap cut in ridge board. I have a lot of debris in the attic that seems to come in from the ridge vents. Is this normal? Do not think water is coming in from this from what I can see.
 

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oldognewtrick

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First, when the decking is cut to allow for air flow, it's common to see saw dust and wood pieces on the attic floor.

Second, when valleys are installed using a shingle run along the valley like a starter shingle, then the field shingles installed over them, it's common to see leaks in valleys. The butt joints don't overlap and seal.

Third, was ice and water shield used in the valleys? Was new step flashing installed in the wall? Are there any visible gaps in the siding? Did this just happen or is this a recurring issue?
 

joecaption

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I see a few issues that should have been addressed before ever installing the new shingles.
In most cases roofers get paid to install roofing and want to get in and out ASAP and are not willing or able to take the time to mess with things like changing a roofline or remove the siding to fix it right.
That siding was installed too close to the shingles. (see how it's rotting from wicking up moisture)
That smaller section of roofing was built wrong, it should have extended out further so it went slightly beyond the outside corner.
There's also no kick out flashing to direct the water away from area.
 

Reelsix

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First, when the decking is cut to allow for air flow, it's common to see saw dust and wood pieces on the attic floor.

Second, when valleys are installed using a shingle run along the valley like a starter shingle, then the field shingles installed over them, it's common to see leaks in valleys. The butt joints don't overlap and seal.

Third, was ice and water shield used in the valleys? Was new step flashing installed in the wall? Are there any visible gaps in the siding? Did this just happen or is this a recurring issue?
Thanks for the reply - debris I am seeing are full leaves and pollen pods etc. It has been coming in after the install fyi.

We are worried that the ice and water shield was left off but have not confirmed. Yes, that step flashing was installed under the siding (which had rotted with old roof) but no visible gaps. It happened a few months ago and is intermittent and seems to be impacted more when the rain is hard.
 

Reelsix

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I see a few issues that should have been addressed before ever installing the new shingles.
In most cases roofers get paid to install roofing and want to get in and out ASAP and are not willing or able to take the time to mess with things like changing a roofline or remove the siding to fix it right.
That siding was installed too close to the shingles. (see how it's rotting from wicking up moisture)
That smaller section of roofing was built wrong, it should have extended out further so it went slightly beyond the outside corner.
There's also no kick out flashing to direct the water away from area.
Thank you for your reply. Yes, the siding had rot from the old roof so we cut it back but it should have been replaced. So the shingles should extend all the way down past the siding and then a kick out flashing installed below this? The leak is more in the center of the room so my assumption is that it would be happening in the middle of the roof but is that wrong to assume and the water could travel back up from that problem area on the corner? (understand it is just a guess for you!)
 

joecaption

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oldognewtrick

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If you get up in the attic, there should be a wet spot on roof decking, rafters, walls, Ridge. Look and see if you can find the source from the attic.
 

Eddie_T

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It looks like the first course shingles on the far side of the valley (view 21) are installed parallel to the valley, the joints will catch water. Also the roof vent looks strange in the photos, it looks like there is a lip that could catch water and debris. If the vents let debris in bats can also get in.
 

nealtw

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It looks like the first course shingles on the far side of the valley (view 21) are installed parallel to the valley, the joints will catch water. Also the roof vent looks strange in the photos, it looks like there is a lip that could catch water and debris. If the vents let debris in bats can also get in.
 

oldognewtrick

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The "lip" on the edge of the ridge vent is there to stop air from being driven into the vent.
 

Reelsix

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If you get up in the attic, there should be a wet spot on roof decking, rafters, walls, Ridge. Look and see if you can find the source from the attic.
Unfortunately, it is very difficult to access this part of the attic. I have tried but it is out of my comfort level of safety to try and get down there. I have a split-level home.
 

nealtw

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Unfortunately, it is very difficult to access this part of the attic. I have tried but it is out of my comfort level of safety to try and get down there. I have a split-level home.
With out inspection from the inside the number of guesses go way up.:(
 
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With out inspection from the inside the number of guesses go way up.:(
Maybe you can cut a hole in the drywall to inspect the area? I know it is not the first choice, but might be something you can do.
I would ALWAYS prefer to do such an access hole in a wall instead of in a ceiling. Makes the patchwork easier (IMO).
And if the wall has wall paper the anxiety is increased.
 

nealtw

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Maybe you can cut a hole in the drywall to inspect the area? I know it is not the first choice, but might be something you can do.
I would ALWAYS prefer to do such an access hole in a wall instead of in a ceiling. Makes the patchwork easier (IMO).
And if the wall has wall paper the anxiety is increased.
They would run into insulation and something to hold the insulation in place, it would have a chance of being sheeted before this roof went on. Might be better to go up thru ceiling or hire a small inspector.
 

Reelsix

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Hi - The roofer came and lifted up shingles in various areas. Found a spot that had moisture present up underneath the shingles. It corresponded with leak area inside my house. The solution was to apply adhesive/roofing caulk to seal the shingles surrounding the problem area. It seems to have helped based on the one rain I have had since the fix.

Should I accept this as a permanent fix and what would be typical given my issue? Or likely to fail sooner than later and should be seen more as a band-aid and they should remove shingles in this area and re-lay and replace sheathing that is leaking?

Thanks
 

Gary

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I'm not a roofer any more, but caulking (depending on how it was done) sounds like a band-aid fix. Shingles, if laid right should not need caulk, with the exception of termination areas.
 

nealtw

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Hi - The roofer came and lifted up shingles in various areas. Found a spot that had moisture present up underneath the shingles. It corresponded with leak area inside my house. The solution was to apply adhesive/roofing caulk to seal the shingles surrounding the problem area. It seems to have helped based on the one rain I have had since the fix.

Should I accept this as a permanent fix and what would be typical given my issue? Or likely to fail sooner than later and should be seen more as a band-aid and they should remove shingles in this area and re-lay and replace sheathing that is leaking?

Thanks
We don't talk about sheeting leaking. the sheeting is the boards the roofing goes on. What did the roofer say about the shingles, and the roof in general, did he mention the sheeting and what did he say about it.
 

Reelsix

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We don't talk about sheeting leaking. the sheeting is the boards the roofing goes on. What did the roofer say about the shingles, and the roof in general, did he mention the sheeting and what did he say about it.
Okay. My assumption was that when you have a leak the sheeting rots out and that is how the water penetrates. He didnt give a clear explanation, unfortunately, other than it could be some nails misplaced causing the leak or water collecting in the valley with heavy rain and running back up into the shingles. He didnt mention sheeting and i forgot to ask about it. Thanks
 
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