leaking tiled roof terrace

Discussion in 'Roofing and Siding' started by Roman, Jan 15, 2011.

  1. Jan 15, 2011 #1

    Roman

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    We just bought a house that has a tiled terrace on part of the garage and covering a lower level mudroom. Some of the tiles are cracked and the grout has deteriorated in some areas. I plan to re-tile the terrace when the weather warms up a little bit but wanted to find out what is the proper water proofing methods for such an area. I don't know what's under the tiles, but whatever it is, there must be some damage since it is leaking through in some areas. I have heard you can lay plastic or hot mop, but I want to use the most durable and longest lasting material/method to prevent future leaks. Any suggestions would be appreciated. I can post a photo of the terrace if it would be helpful. :confused:
     
  2. Jan 15, 2011 #2

    oldognewtrick

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    Roman, 1st off welcome to House Repair Talk. Next, if you can, post a pic of the area you are talking about.
     
  3. Jan 15, 2011 #3
  4. Jan 15, 2011 #4

    Roman

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    Thank you. Here are a few photos of the terrace:

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  5. Jan 15, 2011 #5

    joecaption

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    Sounds like your going to have a big mess on your hands.
    Sounds like some DIY job to me. If this is a flat roof there should have been a one piece membrane layed then a platform could have been built for a deck that just rest on top of with reguler decking boards but never tile.
    Hot mopping can be done but not until all the old roof gets taken off and a whole new underlayment layed and any needed repairs to the old roof rafters.
     
  6. Jan 15, 2011 #6

    Roman

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    I posted some photos but the message is waiting for moderator approval, probably since I am new here. I appreciate your input, maybe you can chime in once you see the photos. I hope it does not get that complicated.
     
  7. Jan 15, 2011 #7

    Roman

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    Here are some photos of the project in question:

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    [​IMG]
     
  8. Jan 15, 2011 #8

    oldognewtrick

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    Roman, what area of the deck is leaking? And where does the water drain to?
     
  9. Jan 15, 2011 #9

    Roman

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    In the first photo in the second set, sorry for duplicates, I didn't think the first set went through, where the t1-11 is painted brown and fern hanging above, there is a gap on the bottom and behind it there is an area that has a gutter around it. There is no drainage anywhere else on the deck. In the second picture, where you can see the garage roof, water sits there in some spots. Before we bought the house, they did repairs on the railing and put new t1-11 where it is primed. I believe this was due to rotted wood. In the corners where the tiles/grout meets the wood, there are thin gaps, so water could be coming in that way. I'm not sure why they would fix all the railings and leave the tiles as they are. So there is a problem with drainage due to the leveling of the deck. I was thinking of at least re-grouting the tiles, replacing the cracked ones, putting in some kind of sealant in the corners where it meets the wood and hopefully this would water proof for the time being. Again, I'm not sure what is under the tile.
     
  10. Jan 16, 2011 #10

    oldognewtrick

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    Roman, how would you feel about getting an awning company to put a cover over the deck area? It will be a lot cheaper and a lot less invasive than a proper fix.
     
  11. Jan 16, 2011 #11

    Roman

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    I already thought about that idea, but since the deck is fairly large and the irregular shaped, it may not be that cheap. It is also fairly windy at times. I would like to find out what options I have in terms of properly water proofing the deck in the interim and once I remove the tiles.
     
  12. Feb 4, 2011 #12

    nealtw

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    The cracked tile would suggest,plywood to thin, joist to small or overspanned. the waterproof membrane should run up the walls some inches. Like Old Dog I can not see where the water is draining . What is the slope of the deck?
    I too think it might be better to look at a light weight roof.
     
  13. Feb 5, 2011 #13

    joecaption

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    You have posted all over the net and everyone agrees this is never going to work out. T111 is not supposed to be installed within 6" of a solid surface or grade. What you have is just going to keep rotting out. All that walls done is form a dam to keep water from running off of the deck.
    Unless there solid concrete under that tile it's never going to stay in place or stay sealed. Under that tile by now is rotted wood and rotted ceiling rafters.
     

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