Leaky and rotten siding

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Sparky617

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The typical french drain can put more water into the ground than is diverted from the area. Water has to pool in the gravel up to the flow line before the pipe even starts removing water. If you use them, make sure the base of the trench and the pipe have a 2% grade. Downspouts should discharge into solid pipe, or onto grade sloping at least 2% away from the structure. Perforated pipe is an invitation for roots to grow into and clog the pipe. - install cleanouts if you use them. If you drop grade through the entire area and slope it away from the house french drains should not be needed. If you use an impermeable surface (concrete, plastic sheeting under pavers, etc.) you can use a flatter grade - as long as it slopes enough to drain.
When installing a French drain, if using the white PVC with holes drilled into the pipe, the holes go facing down not up. Otherwise the ditch needs to be nearly full of water to start carrying the water away. With them pointing down the water level only has to come up about a half inch for it to start flowing down the pipe. I'd recommend the PVC versus the corrugated black plastic as it is easier to keep free of silt.
 

pbellamy

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Thanks for that! All super helpful…

so here’s where I am today. (See pics)

I’ve dug out EVERYTHING to below grade. By dug I mean broken Up a ton of concrete and removed 3-4 layers of aggregate materials Which I’m keep separate so I can reuse…

To replace the siding I needed to get to the bottom of it it and of course there was concrete everywhere particularly around to my kitchen side door. This is built out somewhat on a concrete wall. This had a concrete pad on the top also above grade so I’ve removed that and the metal railings that were there.

so couple of questions.
1: Am I doing the right thing? This feels right to get to below grade but such a massive amount of work. I cannot think of another option. (Yoo late now anyway)

2. The area outside the side wall where my kitchen door is is a tall concrete block square. It has a LOT of infill material. I’m worried if that should be a) left alone b)emptied or c) somedrain holes put in to ensure it doesn’t ingress water and cause more damage.

Wide photos for better context.

Today I’m basically bagging up the concrete mess and wrapping the exposed exterior with tar paper in preparation for cedar horizontal siding…

thoughts and contributions welcome!!!65A2D556-2B4E-44DC-B841-09C85F502B1B.jpeg6D481D37-D80D-44E8-AF70-83262D9CE016.jpeg65A2D556-2B4E-44DC-B841-09C85F502B1B.jpeg65A2D556-2B4E-44DC-B841-09C85F502B1B.jpeg6F04B9D7-2FCC-4938-AA49-9F45F1E7E451.jpeg
 

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bud16415

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Looks great no turning back now just keep plowing ahead.

I had a friend that did a similar back breaking project and he was a scout leader and he bought 20 5 gallon buckets and had the scouts come over for a day. It was unreal how much they moved. When i did a project like that I rented a skid steer for a couple days and hired my nephew to run it as he is good at running one and it wasn't the time for me to try and learn.
 

pbellamy

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Ha!

I don’t have 20 scouts available but I have managed to clear and separate the rubble so far…

and yes Tylenol is a majorpart of this project!

Current state below:

still wondering if I should clear the rubble from inside that block wall…

this afternoon is all about tar paper!
image.jpg
 

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Steve123

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still wondering if I should clear the rubble from inside that block wall…
That looks like your footings for your porch/landing. What are your plans for that porch?
I would tend to leave the rubble in there.
 

pbellamy

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Yea right now my plan is to use railway ties as a cap and block pave (replacement patio) to match the work I’ve done at Hyde back of the house.
My plan (still formulating is to carry the general feel of the lower patios to this area.

pictures of rear patios attached to give an idea..

so general consensus is to prep on top of Thai rubble with gravel, sand and block (with a drain to the side.)

pictures show patio and deck work I’ve done to rear of property vehicle was a mess but at least not as bad as what I’m dealing with at the front!

image.jpg
 

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bud16415

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I would also back fill with whatever busted rubble you have good base and good way to get rid of it. Add back the gravel you dug out and then top off with some new and compact before laying the pavers.
 

pbellamy

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Yea excellent.

I’ve separated out the rubble and layers of gravel, sand, earth as well as small and large concrete. My intention is to use it to provide a good, appropriate level to relay block paving.

Bottom line new patio will level out at 6 inches BELOW grade not 12 inches above!.

big issue is the patio is pretty large… first priority is making sure the house is watertight and new siding is installed properly.

I’m excited to be doing the siding. A great routing opportunity!
 

bud16415

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Make sure you compact properly. It is worth the cost to rent a compactor when you get to that point.

You will have quite a bit of material left over if you need to do any grading now is the time.
 

pbellamy

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Yeah, I’ll be laying rough down until I have the whole area dropped…

compactor rental is a really good investment especially for such a large area… I think I’m a few weeks away from that yet!!!
 

pbellamy

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So a quick progress update…

I’m currently putting cedar shiplap up. Going for 4inch horizontal as it will match the fences I’ve previously built and will contrast the blue vertical siding on the rear of the house. design wise I think it will make this Part of the house ‘pop’.

So routed planks for shiplap design and I’m away.

bottom board is black painted 4 inch protruding about 1 inch below foundation. Metal drip tray ‘z’ and now I’m working my way up with full length planks…

inside and outside corners are black painted cedar for contrast.

next question will be around the window.

mom going to frame this in black cedar. I’ve Removed the original metal drip flashing. And I’m assuming I put a new drip flashing above my new frame rather than on top of the metal window?

pics for progress..C719FB98-2C39-452C-81B2-664B13F75AF8.jpeg
 

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pbellamy

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So been a few weeks of hard labor but starting to make progress…

dug down and filled cracks in foundation with poly and added an external water sealant (black tar-like paint)

Vertical rotten siding is now replaced with horizontal cedar to contrast the original blue.
I’m super pleased with the result so far but..

As I dug out the patio next to the house C34E394A-2A8A-42B7-AA64-AD34956DF42F.jpeg6EACEEC0-4D46-49D4-9035-9AAB285282E9.jpegB9E08B1E-941A-4087-A06A-4AA8FE1C601A.jpeg it became clear that It was built in an old asphalt drive and likely that is on rock. So my issue now is that the hill slopes to the house giving me a challenge still with appropriate drainage.

Lots of digging to do but at least the house looks better and the basement survived a pretty heavy storm with no water ingress.

Latest images as I brace for the next phase of patio removal…
 
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