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Lift Delivery

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Clark

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How did all you guys with lifts unload the lift from the freight truck on delivery? I am ready to buy but can't think of any way to get a 1500lb package off of an 18-wheeler. Even with a lift gate, how would I get it on the gate, and off of it once its at ground level?

I need some more insight on this from previous experiences please.
 

Bushytails

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Ideally you'd want the truck driver to bring a pallet jack, or a forklift. Most places that do home delivery will have a pallet jack on the truck, but you should call them and ask first.

--Bushytails
 

threewheelin007

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I would find a friend with a dump truck or flat bed/stake body dump and slide it off the flat bed onto your truck ,stap it down till you get to where you want it .Split the 2 towers apart before you tip the bed up (protect your concrete) I would use a come a long or rope to let it slide down the bed to the floor.keep 2nd one fixed to bed till your ready to slide it down your tilted truck bed.A couple buddys could help tilt it up and once upright they can be "walked" to their spot on floor. Use a large piece of old carpet to protect lift as its sliding down the truck bed and also a scrap of carpet to protect your concrete ,just remove it as soon as it hits the ground,ie...before you tilt the tower upright.
I hope this helps
 

kwmainer

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If you're driveway is concrete... get an engine lift. (they usually have wheels).

Have the delivery folks set it on the ground in your driveway. Roll out the lift, attach to the tower midway. Be slow and methodical, be sure to figure out where your fulcrum (balance point) is. Let the lift lift one tower. Balance it and move it into position.

Run the lift back down the drive and get the other tower.

Depending on how it's delivered, you may have to uncrate/strap parts of the delivery and roll them up the driveway on the lift in sections. Each one is different.
 

sajis18

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Less moving parts refers to the back swing itself. Prior to the no-lift, most delivery troubleshooting (other than balance) revolved around the direction of the back swing and the down swing. With fewer moving parts, no-lift the delivery is much smaller resulting in a "softer" draw delivery with good "feel".

Losing the "C" Curve The affect of the hack configuration and placement was rarely discussed as a delivery variable. Because of this, it was probably the most under diagnosed problem in the back swing delivery. The common problem of the "C" curve was created by the hack placement. The rules state that each hack must be three inches from the centerline. This means the hacks were roughly six inches apart. If you place your foot straight in the hack (this is what was taught), there is not enough room between the ankle and the centerline to draw the rock back straight (on the line of delivery). Most curlers who kept their foot straight in the hack had to draw the rock back (back swing) outside the line of delivery to clear the ankle. This resulted in the rock coming back down across the line and in front of the body. This is the "C" curve. The most proficient back swingers twisted their foot in the hack to avoid this. This was never taught in any curling clinic but was absolutely necessary to maintain the line of delivery. Since the rock is not swung in the no-lift, this is not a factor.

Even with the no-lift delivery, there are still opportunities to create the "C". Avoid pulling the rock in front of your body as you slide out of the hack. This happens much less with fewer moving parts..........................
 

yellowvetteman

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I rented a trailer and picked it up at the freight terminal. They fork lifted it on to the trailer. Once home had a few neighbors help lift it off the trailer in parts. The engine hoist is a good idea and also those 4 wheel movers dollies would help.
 

mustanggarage

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I know this thread is old, but in the interest of adding information and help to others searching the site I will add my experience. I have an old but functional open car trailer.



I spoke with the guy who built my building and he said I could have the lift delivered to his place of business and he would use his forklift to get it off the semi. I am sure you can find some business where you live with a forklift who would unload it for you. maybe not for free but at least you could get it off the truck. uhaul rents car trailers if you don't know anyone who has one.


then I rented a skid loader with a forklift attached instead of the bucket.



we used the skid loader to unload the trailer and to lift the assembled posts in to position we also used it to lift the top beam in to position. the skid loader rental was 180 dollars a day and we were done with what we needed it for in less than four hours. this with 2 people who had never installed one of these before and with instructions that were far from optimal.
anyway this was a pretty easy way to do it. these posts are heavy while I am sure you could do it with lots of friends or an engine hoist this method was certainly a lot easier. good luck

 

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