"Luxury" Vinyl

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Sparky617

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I could do all one shade, but then I have the extra color, probably 700 sf of it.

I would put in that flat carpeting in the classroom. I don't even know if it's called carpet.
I wanted to put in a low pile commercial carpeting or carpet squares in the classroom. I lost the battle, though everyone agrees we should have gone with carpet due to the noise factor. At some point we'll probably cover over the LVT with carpet. The building was built in 1967 so the original floor was asbestos tile. At some point it was covered with VCT (vinyl composite tile). To avoid having to do an abatement we left it all in place and covered it all with the LVT.

I like the continuity of having one type of floor. We have hardwoods on our first floor, stairway and upstairs hallway. For now we have carpet in the bedrooms and bonus room. I'm considering replacing the bonus room carpet with hardwoods. I use it as my home office and carpet doesn't work with office chairs. I may do hardwoods in our master bedroom at the same time.
 

Spicoli43

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I wanted to put in a low pile commercial carpeting or carpet squares in the classroom. I lost the battle, though everyone agrees we should have gone with carpet due to the noise factor. At some point we'll probably cover over the LVT with carpet. The building was built in 1967 so the original floor was asbestos tile. At some point it was covered with VCT (vinyl composite tile). To avoid having to do an abatement we left it all in place and covered it all with the LVT.

I like the continuity of having one type of floor. We have hardwoods on our first floor, stairway and upstairs hallway. For now we have carpet in the bedrooms and bonus room. I'm considering replacing the bonus room carpet with hardwoods. I use it as my home office and carpet doesn't work with office chairs. I may do hardwoods in our master bedroom at the same time.
Ok, well it sounds like you are running into the same situation, as replacing the carpet with hardwood will result in a different color, correct? As far as the church, I would get carpet remnants for where the chairs and tables go. That or scrap everything and have all new carpet put in.

Now that I'm really thinking about it though, people won't refuse to buy because I have all one color throughout. I'm over thinking it.
 

Sparky617

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We had a large remnant that we had cut in half, bound and made into two area rugs. That has helped a bit with the noise.

On the uniform floors thoughout a house, I think a little variety is ok. On our pastor's house there were four types of flooring on the first floor. That was a bit excessive. With LVP you can do a unified floor throughout. If you have carpet I don't think anyone would object to something else in the kitchen and bathroom.
 

Spicoli43

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We had a large remnant that we had cut in half, bound and made into two area rugs. That has helped a bit with the noise.

On the uniform floors thoughout a house, I think a little variety is ok. On our pastor's house there were four types of flooring on the first floor. That was a bit excessive. With LVP you can do a unified floor throughout. If you have carpet I don't think anyone would object to something else in the kitchen and bathroom.
Yeah, I'm still thinking about new carpet in all the bedrooms at the last minute, after all my stuff is in storage.

How would you install LVP in the bathroom, up against the tub?
 

Sparky617

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In the couple of installations I've done (volunteer work, not a pro) we have handled it two ways. First was to caulk the joint after carefully cutting the profile of the LVP to the tub. We used white caulk to match the tub. At the pastor's house we used quarter round as we did in the rest of the room. That was what she wanted. Quarter round is certainly easier than carefully scribbing the joint.

I'm contemplating what to do when I replace the carpet in our bedrooms. In my house's price range hardwoods or carpet are common. With the hallway having hardwoods I can do each bedroom differently or separately since there is the hardwood buffer between rooms. Our hardwoods are oak finished in place so matching the existing isn't hard. And since the joints will be at the doors having a transition strip isn't unsightly so I don't have to weave the new into the old and refinish all of the floors when I do the bedrooms.
 

Spicoli43

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In the couple of installations I've done (volunteer work, not a pro) we have handled it two ways. First was to caulk the joint after carefully cutting the profile of the LVP to the tub. We used white caulk to match the tub. At the pastor's house we used quarter round as we did in the rest of the room. That was what she wanted. Quarter round is certainly easier than carefully scribbing the joint.

I'm contemplating what to do when I replace the carpet in our bedrooms. In my house's price range hardwoods or carpet are common. With the hallway having hardwoods I can do each bedroom differently or separately since there is the hardwood buffer between rooms. Our hardwoods are oak finished in place so matching the existing isn't hard. And since the joints will be at the doors having a transition strip isn't unsightly so I don't have to weave the new into the old and refinish all of the floors when I do the bedrooms.
Thanks, I wasn't thinking about quarter round, but it would have to be small against the tub, not the normal size that would be against a staircase. Or, maybe I'm just making that up, but I see it in my head.

Another benefit to the same color throughout and no carpet is no transition strips. Not that they are difficult, just a step not needed.
 

MrMiz

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I've done a lot of LVP. In my rentals along with my personal residence and private residences. CoreTech, LifeProof and a couple of others. I returned on brand I didn't like about 10 years ago ( I can't remember the name so I won't bad mouth the company unless I'm sure), but it's completely changed since then. I know you already made your choice but I'm going to through this out there for the next guy.

I ALWAYS buy the kind with the underlayment already attached, and it has to be 100% waterproof. I won't even look at if if it doesn't meet those 2 criteria. My reasoning is : underlayment is a royal pain... it's a lot less work if it's already attached. 100% water proof because in my option this type of things fail because of moisture. Moisture in the subfloor, moisture from the room it's in, accidental moisture etc. So since using only 100% water proof with underlayment attached I haven't had to replace a plank yet. The previous stuff I've had to replace a lot of for various reasons. Leaking dishwasher... rising water level causing the concrete to wick more... even a simple spill has damage the other non 100% water proof kind. I've installed in every location you can think of... even a shed.

For a bathroom install against a tub I silicone the tub to the subfloor, when I lay out the floor I make sure I have a minimum of 2 inch plank at the tub. When I get to the tub I lay the piece perfectly lined up with the previous piece and I take short piece (around 12") and trim off the under side tounge... removing what I expect the gap between the tub and floor to be. Then I use the short cut off as a scribe and drag a line across the plank that is perfectly lined up with the previous row. It should only take you one or 2 tries to get the gap between the tub and the last plank perfect buy "editing" your scribe plank. Then when I have it laid and done I tape the plank close to 1/8" from the edge of the plank with painters tape and caulk with white silicone and right after I smooth I pull the tape. Make sure you only use enough silicone to fill the gap it really should minimally smear on the tape. If it does just make sure it's thin before you pull the tape because it will make a small ridge in the silicone. It doesn't look bad with the small ridge it just looks better when is just a perfect line. You want the gap between your tub and plank to be right at 1/8" if you can for the best performance for both the silicone and to allow a little expansion and contraction though in my experience the 100% water proof stuff has little to no expansion. You just want to maintain it because the manufacturer recommends it.

It always cracks me up when I see those warnings that you shouldn't install it in a room that has heavy furniture. Like you've check the weigh rating on your couch or something. It's also funny because most people install it under toilets, and vanities, or set a door on top of it. None of the 100% water proof stuff I've installed has buckled yet and I've put it under everything. Even under cabinets and then installed them at the request of a family member and that's been like that for 5 years with no failures. I don't think it would be something I would do or recommend to everybody, but it worked in this case and that's what they wanted and couldn't be swayed from.

The one thing I could see is sun exposure damaging it (though I haven't seen it happen yet) however sun exposure alters just about every other kind of flooring too. I just installed a bunch last week in the mountains. It will be interesting if I see anything noticeable in it at high altitude and the extreme difference in temp than where I normally install. We'll see cuz I'll have to fix it if I do.

Hope that helps.

Edit - for got to mention I actually really LOVE being able to do different kinds/colors in different rooms. Even alternating colors can have results I like sometimes. I haven't done a pattern in it yet, but I would love to. Like a square boarder around a room. I'm sure somebody will release a brand with it already built into the picture on the plank soon. That being said for resale value NEVER change colors. Stick with one and do it throughout. Colors are a personal preference and only about 10% of the population can visualize change in a home. If you alternate colors on them their brains literally check out because they can't visualize anything other than what they see. The same goes for painting. I can't tell you how many people I've dealt with can't even grasp a different color than what's already on the wall in front of them. Whenever I paint I always paint one full wall and then have them come and take a look before I do anything else. I've saved myself weeks of work by doing this.

Edit 2 - another tip. If you run into trouble with not being able to adjust your floor laterally you can put down a strip of painters tap and stomp it in the direction you want it to go and it will slide laterally. Only works for about 3 planks, but it works really good when your stuck and can't get a tool on an edge.IMG_20200628_190146.jpgIMG_20200624_133445.jpg
I have about another 2000 sq ft. of this to go. 2 different colors. Those pictures are of the thinner "cheaper" stuff in the basement. The stuff on the main floor is full thickness and planks are about 9" wide 4' long.
 
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We had a large remnant that we had cut in half, bound and made into two area rugs. That has helped a bit with the noise.

On the uniform floors thoughout a house, I think a little variety is ok. On our pastor's house there were four types of flooring on the first floor. That was a bit excessive. With LVP you can do a unified floor throughout. If you have carpet I don't think anyone would object to something else in the kitchen and bathroom.
can you give me an idea of what the carpet remnant binding cost ?? I have some remnants of outdoor carpet, and want to have some runners bound to go across the high traffic areas.... THANKS !!! JJ in Jacksonville, FL
 

Sparky617

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can you give me an idea of what the carpet remnant binding cost ?? I have some remnants of outdoor carpet, and want to have some runners bound to go across the high traffic areas.... THANKS !!! JJ in Jacksonville, FL
Not sure, the vendor did it for free. They had a pretty large contract with the church for both the carpet and the flooring. Probably $1 a foot or more, but I really have no idea.
 

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