Marble Tile installation hints/tips?

Discussion in 'Flooring' started by Hack, Dec 21, 2007.

  1. Dec 21, 2007 #1

    Hack

    Hack

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    I'm going to be installing 12X12 marble tile in my bathroom next week.

    Any suggestions on the install? This will be installed over 1/2" Durock which is over 13/16" T&G fir and 13/16" plywood in places.

    Should I:

    - Put mortar on floor, or back butter the tiles? Either?
    - Use tape on Durock joints with mortar?

    Any other suggestions/tips/hints would be greatly appreciated...

    Oh, and thaks, Daryl for your insightful information!
     
  2. Dec 21, 2007 #2

    ToolGuy

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    Is the durock already down? I always glue it down with t&g because of so much movement. If it's already down you should make sure and screw it every 4 inches to make sure it's good and secure.

    You only need to apply the mortar to the floor. The important thing is to make sure it's not too dry. A good mix is wet and sticky. I mix it so it's just thick enough to stand up when spread with the notched trowel.

    Unless the instructions say otherwise, you should use latex instead of water to mix the mortar. I like Leinweber's (I may be spelling it wrong) but any good quality brand will do.

    A trowel with 5/16" or 3/8" notches seems to work best for 12" tiles.

    Hope that's helpful :)
     
  3. Dec 21, 2007 #3

    CraigFL

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    I'm not sure what you're going to do about the joints but I always butt the tiles with marble and use no grouted joints(except of course to fill any slight unevenness between the edges). It is important to be sure there is NO flex in the base for a quality installation. If you can get underneath, you may want to add additional reinforcement.
     
  4. Dec 21, 2007 #4

    Hack

    Hack

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    Thanks for the input guys.

    Toolguy, The Durock is not in yet. The rough inspection is scheduled for next Wednesday. Then I'll do the floor. I plan to mortar the Durock to the T&G.

    CraigFL, My previous home had a marble floor in the bathroom with no grout. We were constantly dealing with mildew or mold between the tiles. A little water would get in there. It drove the wife crazy...

    So this time I've decided to do a small gap for non-sanded grout. I'm thinking 1/8" or 3/32" (thanks to Daryl)
     
  5. Dec 21, 2007 #5

    ToolGuy

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    Sounds like you're on the right track. One thing not mentioned is to make sure the tile mortar is for marble & stone. I think it's a different mixture than used for ceramic.

    Keep us posted. Got a camera? :)
     
  6. Jan 2, 2008 #6

    Hack

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    I took some pictures of the progress, but left the camera at home today. We closed the office from the 21st until today, so I had some time to work on the bathroom...

    The electrical is done, plumbing is done and both inspected.

    Drywall is hung and got inspected Monday the 31st. Pasting and taping starts today.

    I'll post some pictures when I get a chance.
     
  7. Jan 2, 2008 #7

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

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    GO Jeff!
    It looks like you are really hanging in there.
    A quick hint about your drywall finish; rather than sand the compound, use a spray bottle on those ridges and scrape them gently with your 6" knife, then use a damp sopnge to finish up. The wet sponge (not dripping) will dissolve the high spots and use it to fill in the low spots and saves your lungs and eyes all that dust.
    Glenn
     
  8. Jan 3, 2008 #8

    ToolGuy

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    That's a good tip about sponging rather than sanding. I do it all the time, but you gotta be a good taper to get away with it. ;)
     
  9. Jan 7, 2008 #9

    Hack

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    Ah, man...I wish I had read this before I sanded :(

    I was out sick Friday...didn't work on the bathroom at all. I sanded the first mud coat yesterday. Took me about 2-3 hours. It actually turned out pretty good.

    I keep a vacuum cleaner running in the room while I sand drywall. It's a water filter type vacuum so it really keeps the dust down.

    I called a guy I know who's really good with finish on drywall. He's done some texture work for me in the past. Since this room is smooth, I really want it to be done right. He doesn't charge much at all and does awesome work. He can probably get it done in one coat. It would probably take me 2-3 (maybe 10) more to get it right.

    Still no pictures. I forgot the camera again :eek:
     
  10. Jan 9, 2008 #10

    Hack

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    Quick update on progress.

    Drywall guy coming tonight to smooth or "almost smooth" the walls.

    The wife is headed out to get some primer for the walls, as well as swap our sanded grout for non-sanded grout.

    If all goes as planned, we'll prime Friday, paint Saturday, and put down the backer Board on Sunday (pretty full schedule...the wife really cracks the whip :D ...she wants her bathroom back)

    I'm stopping at the big box store tomorrow to pick up backer board and mortar for the backer board. 6 sheets.

    Q: Hardibacker or Durock? Hardibacker appears to be more consistent across the width, and the edges seem like they'd be easier to work with, but it doesn't look as "tough" as Durock...

    Any opinions on each?
     
  11. Jan 10, 2008 #11

    ToolGuy

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    Wow... busy, busy, busy. I'm getting tired just reading this! :D

    I haven't tried Hardibacker, have always used Durock and get good results. While you at the big box, you might want to get one of those carbide tipped scoring tools. It's about $7 and you'll find plenty of uses for it besides scoring backer board.

    [​IMG]

    I swear you can score concrete with this tool, then turn around and cut glass with it. ;)
     
  12. Jan 14, 2008 #12

    Hack

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    HaridBacker is down. That was tough work! My legs and back are killing me today! Not even Aleve or a Martini helped :p

    Marble goes down this weekend. I've got this week to plan how to do that.

    How about sealer? Do I just seal the grout? Can I just use a small artists brush to apply the sealer directly to the grout?
     

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