Need pro advice on a backup sump pump

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum' started by Billbill84, May 8, 2019.

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  1. May 8, 2019 #1

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

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    So my new house has a fully finished basement that's very nice. I'm concerned about protection against blackouts and or pump failure. I think if i went the battery backup option I'd still worry because I don't trust batteries and a second pedestal pump would be useless in a blackout. So I learned about these backup water powered pumps which would protect against both scenarios! Seems too good to be true, other than a high water bill, still cheaper than a flood though.
    Does anyone have any advise I could use about these water powered backup sump pumps? My main shut off is about 25 ft from the sump room but luckily for me, the last owner had a washer/dryer in there 3 ft from the sump so there's my tie in, right? Are these water powered backups reliable? What's it run to install one? Thx
     
  2. May 15, 2019 #2

    Diehard

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    I'll let others answer your questions.

    I just want to give you a heads up relative to the need for some type of backflow preventer device on you potable water supply. You should check with your local water purveyor as to their exact requirements, as it may vary between jurisdictions.
    The requirements would likely vary depending on whether the discharges from the two types of pumps are piped together or separately. Being piped separately would remove the chance of back pressure on the water service and lessen the device requirements. All depends on your local authority.

    EDIT: If you had to have a testable backflow preventer that would likely mean an annual cost for testing it.
     
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  3. May 16, 2019 #3

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

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    I'd prefer to have it piped to a completely separate discharge line along side of the primary. Thanks for the back flow preventor tip, I'll definitely look into it. Thx
     
  4. May 22, 2019 at 4:42 PM #4

    Fireguy5674

    Fireguy5674

    Fireguy5674

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    They have sump pump systems now that will send an alert to your cell phone if the pump or pumps fail and let you know you have a problem. With a fully finished basement, I would be tempted to install two pumps with battery backup and an alert system. Then keep a small generator handy in case the power and the battery fail. The other option is to have a two pump system and install an automatic backup generator which will not only keep your basement dry but your furnace running so your pipes don't freeze. It is just a matter of how far do you want to go and how much money do you want to spend.
     
  5. May 22, 2019 at 5:32 PM #5

    WyrTwister

    WyrTwister

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    If I installed a generator , it would power more than the pump & HVAC .

    Makes me glad we do not have a basement . That & my old knees are not happy with stairs .

    Wyr
    God bless
     

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