need to remove this pesky soap holder

Discussion in 'Walls and Ceilings' started by gghrt000, Jul 21, 2014.

  1. Jul 21, 2014 #1

    gghrt000

    gghrt000

    gghrt000

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    There is an ugly soap holder made of probably ceramic and firmly planted to bathroom shower tiles. Part of it already was broken off and today I tried to take off whole thing. I tried with big flat screw + hammer through its seam between tiles but it wont chip away that easily. So I started working my way using big plier chipping away piece by piece from broken part since it has a hollowness. This is what is left in the pic below. On one of the Monday afternoon, I am going to do with a brute force when adjacent neighbours gone to work to see if i can get off the rest without breaking the tile. However I am wonderin if there is any easy to get it off. Any solvent or any agent that I can apply around the edge to make it softer may be? Thanks!

    IMG_20140720_182345.jpg
     
  2. Jul 21, 2014 #2

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

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    Sorry, but I am giggling at your determination and use of manly brute force. We have all been there, trying to use whatever tools we have at hand.

    You need an angle grinder with a ceramic cutting disk (they are inexpensive and REALLY useful). Just carefully cut the grout line so when you hit it you don't break the adjacent tiles. Once this is done, use a masonry chisel (also cheap) to knock off the pieces.

    Some of the wall will come off and you will have to fill this before sealing the wall again. Here is where your problem begins .... Pros use an elastomeric sealer (RedGard is my favorite) but it is really expensive for your situation. It would be painted on the wallboard, allowed to cure, then you can re-tile as needed.

    Not sure how else to fix something this small. Go talk to the guys at a tile store. Maybe you can beg for a small batch of RedGard from someone. What you DO NOT want is a leak at this spot (I had to fix one once). You can use regular thinset to apply the replacement tile. Then grout per normal.

    Clean and scrape the grout (use a grout saw - cheap) in the whole shower. You probably caused cracks from all that pounding. Re-grout as needed anyplace. I would apply grout sealer to the whole shower at least two coats, letting it dry completely each time ...

    HAVE FUN :D
     
  3. Jul 21, 2014 #3

    CallMeVilla

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  4. Jul 21, 2014 #4

    gghrt000

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    Thanks, it is really these little stuff that holds back after major work is done. Like they say devil is in the details. I am going to look at angle grinder.
     
  5. Jul 21, 2014 #5

    CallMeVilla

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    For the amount of work you do, an entry level grinder would be sufficient. (Ryobi)

    http://www.homedepot.com/b/Tools-Hardware-Power-Tools-Grinders-Angle-Grinders/N-5yc1vZc2fw

    However, you should check Craigslist for used tools. You can pick up a higher quality grinder for $30 that will last longer. The key is how many AMPS of power. More amps = more power!

    Just remember to hold it very firmly and cut slowly so it doesn't take off on you. You might practice cutting in the tile area that is already messed up. Get a feel for the tool, then go about the business of your final cuts. Try to cut only as deep as the tile ... DO NOT cut into the drywall behind the tile if you can avoid it.

    ROCK 'N ROLL ! :D
     
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  6. Aug 11, 2014 #6

    gghrt000

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    alright guys, finally took the whole thing out. But not with the angle. Got a cheap one from homedepo but that damn is hell of a noisy even with my motorcycle helmet on with all sparkles flying off. Plus it looks like it might take a better part of a day at best to work around whole thing. so I worked around with flatscrew driver with hammer to chip away and once made a hole in the center pretty much wedge force to take all the pieces off. This is what is left now, first picture below. And this is a definitely a big day!

    Next step is I am not going to need any soap tray so just want to plug with a 6x4 tile should use simple grout to seal the edges? what is behind left is hole look like I penetrated through a some kind of paper in the process (which I hope did not mess up something) but there is another layer of paper I can see which is intact.

    Lastly I am going to put those smart tiles over those ceramic tiles, I am thinking to use to grout to level the entire tile area. Is it the way to go? Thanks!

    IMG_20140810_170051.jpg

    IMG_20140810_170057.jpg

    IMG_20140810_170411.jpg

    IMG_20140810_170451.jpg

    IMG_20140810_170456.jpg
     
  7. Aug 11, 2014 #7

    CallMeVilla

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    Guess I should have come over to help you. I always wear ear protectors and safety glasses. Gloves are optional. You cut inside the soap dish first, controlling the depth of the cut, cutting around the perimeter but inside the grout line.

    Then, because you are now a certified angle grinder professional, you can work outward, trimming the tile away as you get closer and closer to the grout line. If you are REALLY good, the last bit will fly off, leaving a clean edge. Being very careful, you can even trim the residual face of the wall by gently moving side to side. If you suck, well, you bash a hole through the greenboard and you are left with a crappy hole in the wall where water can get in someday ...

    We all make mistakes. Not meaning to offend you. :D

    Have never used the "Smart Tile" ( http://www.thesmarttiles.com/en_us/ ) Are you planning on retiling the entire shower or just the new and quite fashionable hole you created? :D Actually, if you are going to a new look, maybe you should remove that entire horizontal course and install an accent band. By the 2nd or 3rd tile, you ought to be able to do it without punching a hole in the greenboard!

    Whatever ... Here is a video which gives you the basics for fixing a drywall hole. [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K37G2j0K8BA[/ame]

    You have to do your best to square up that irregular hole BUT LEAVE A LIP FOR SCREWS. Cut a piece of greenboard for the hole, and hope you have enough old drywall lip to hold the backing board.

    Actually your biggest problem is waterproofing the hole. There are elastomeric paint-on coverings (RedGard) which are great but not available in small quantities. Do some checking because you really need to seal that patch before tiling. Once you do that, you can tile with anything that fits your sense of interior design ... BUT make sure you apply grout sealer (multiple coats) to prevent water seeping into the new grout lines.

    Shower.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2014
  8. Aug 11, 2014 #8

    nealtw

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    I watched the video on Smart Tile, they don't say what it is, sounds like vinyl. I think with your patch, you a year or two away from major repairs, with drywall behind the tile you already have strikes against the job. If you have access to the other sides of these walls digg in and inspect the back sides of the drywall near the plumbing. Any bad smell coming out of that hole?
     
  9. Aug 11, 2014 #9

    gghrt000

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    Hi Nealtw, There was not any smell coming out of. When you say patch what do you mean? What could go wrong? Can you elaborate on this one? I'd rather take it seriously as this is a multi-dwelling unit and last thing I want is damage in the building structure not to mention other residences.

    LAter evening I went to store and purchased glue+group combo and 2 counts of 2x6inch tiles as hole was exactly measuring 4x6. WIth grout/glue applied with the 2 tiles it fit exactly and looks pretty waterproof at least in visual inspection.
    I might be able to access it from otherwisde that is from balcony.
    Thanks,
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2014
  10. Aug 11, 2014 #10

    gghrt000

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    Tile is just plastic peel-and-stick type, I already started putting but it appear I did not buy enough quantity less one of the package with 12 unit was ruined with water damage so job is halfway now.
    I am basically covering the entire tile area all around. Ordered another couple of packages to complete it.
    I will put some pictures tonight.
     
  11. Aug 12, 2014 #11

    nealtw

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    The job that was done in the first place was not the best, drywall is not req behind show tile. The regard that Villa taked about should hace been between the tile and the backing and grout itself is not water proof. If you look closely you will see cracks in the grout especially in the corners. I would expect leaking in the corners and around the taps, if water gets behind the tile the drywall is food for mold. Then the stuff that you are applying over might be fine for backsplash but for shower I doubt. After all that is said, you may be lucky and everything will be fine, but I wouldn't bet on it.
     
  12. Aug 12, 2014 #12

    gghrt000

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    Hi nealtw, I think i partly got it now. YOu are saying the original installation of the soap tray was not good.
    Anyways did some research for really good one, looks like one has to install backerboard behind tiles for waterproof insulation. It looks like nor tiles nor grouts are waterproof.
    Looks ike part of the problem is I am not sure this wall has it. All I saw was one layer of paper which is torn apart and another brown color one still intact. I am pretty sure those are not drywalls. I am not sure there will be a drywall behind it I dont know know what is behind. I'd like to remove adjacent tiles and install the backerboard but if entire wall has no then it is not worth and leave it as it is for now.
     
  13. Aug 12, 2014 #13

    nealtw

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    If I look at your picture and compare it to Villas video. It looks the same to me. It looks to me that the brown paper is just paper backed insulation, if that is an outside wall, it would be expected.
     
  14. Aug 13, 2014 #14

    gghrt000

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    ok, i guess i will have to live with the current tile patch and hope it wont happen. Sort of r.roulette.
    At least I solace myself by saying that i did not make it worse than it was. :). Before tearing down the the original soap tray had a crack which means its follow interior was very well exposed to humidity and moisture. Here is the new pic now. As you can see I started laying the peel-n-stick tiles and looks much better than the plain white one. These are not real tiles, but turned out much better than what I expected. I guess I will wait to see how long these will last.

    IMG_20140812_230752.jpg
     
  15. Aug 14, 2014 #15

    CallMeVilla

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    Going to hold my breath ... I hope you scrubbed the old tile surface to remove every last trace of soap scum and oil. Never been a big fan of "peel-n-stick" ....

    WALL.jpg
     
  16. Aug 18, 2014 #16

    gghrt000

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    holding my breath too :)
     
  17. Aug 18, 2014 #17

    gottodo1

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    Hey, can we get some pictures of the whole thing completed? Any update on leak/smells, of the mold variety that is.
     
  18. Aug 18, 2014 #18

    gghrt000

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    i had run out of tiles while I was doing. I had used 2 of the packets which in the picture when I got onto last 3rd all of them were bad. So I ordered another set from online which should be coming soon. It looks great so far only question is how long it can last only time will tell.
     
  19. Aug 18, 2014 #19

    slownsteady

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    In the meantime (because eventually this stuff will fail), learn about wall repair and tiling (if you want that) so that in the least you will be able to understand and choose critically between contractors. Or, at best, DIY.
     
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  20. Aug 19, 2014 #20

    gghrt000

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    Yes, i do ack I did not take this bathroom job seriously as the other ones I did before. Still learning.. The fact that patching the hole with tile and grout and having it realize it is still not guaranteed to be a waterproof was quite a bit of a rude awakening.
     
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