New basement wall issue

Discussion in 'Walls and Ceilings' started by RyanBruner, Oct 24, 2008.

  1. Oct 24, 2008 #1

    RyanBruner

    RyanBruner

    RyanBruner

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    Hello, everyone. Thanks for the help in my previous question a while back.

    I've been working on framing walls, and making slow but steady progress. I'm a tad perplexed at how to handle the basement windows, but nothing major.

    Where I'm stuck, however, is along one wall. There is duct work about 8 inches away from the wall hanging down, allowing me enough space to put a top plate along most of the wall. But there is about a 6-ft section of wall where plumbing comes down from the ceiling, travels horizontally about 6 ft, and then drops down into the floor. My problem is, this leaves no place for any kind of top plate. I can't even move my wall out 4 inches because of the duct work.

    So, how does one make a wall with a top plate when there is nothing up above to nail a top plate into? How do you secure the horizontal studs in such a case? I'm guessing there is something obvious, because all the web searches I've done looking for an answer only give brief descriptions of framing around obstructions..but this one is never covered.

    Thanks. (I hope my description is clear.)
     
  2. Oct 24, 2008 #2

    RyanBruner

    RyanBruner

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    Here. I'm attaching a picture that I whipped up to try to illustrate better. This is looking at the basement wall in question. The gray bit along the top is the duct work that is IN FRONT OF the plumping and wall, looking on from this direction. The green is the actual plumbing, but it is behind the duct work. (FOr illustrative purposes, though, it is showing through.)

    So, the question is how to frame a wall along that section UNDERNEATH the plumbing that is horizontal?

    Thanks.

    basement.gif
     
  3. Oct 24, 2008 #3

    spaz2965

    spaz2965

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    Hi Ryan,

    You may frame a shirter wall, so that you are under the duct and frame over to your pipe, so now you will have a top plate, nail blocking to wall and next to studs for securing that part of the wall, do the same on opposite side of your pipe. I am hoping that this will help. If your duct work still sticks out past you framing then you want to build a bulk head around you duct work. Hope some of this makes sence to you and is help for framing. Good luck.

    Joe~~

    100_0096.jpg

    100_0094.jpg

    100_0307.jpg

    100_0300.jpg
     
  4. Oct 24, 2008 #4

    spaz2965

    spaz2965

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    The first picture has the block nailed to wall so that your framed wall may be secured. Hope these pictures help.

    Joe~~
     
  5. Oct 25, 2008 #5

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

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    Or use some 3/4 inch or even half inch plywood for hard to cover spots. I have used it for entire framed out "under areas" of the ductwork. Just attach some studs somewhere in the ceiling, and then stick anyshaped plywood you need.:D Just remember that the duct is right behind it when you go to hang something up when it is finished.

    Screws and plywood, you could build a boat.
     
  6. Oct 25, 2008 #6

    RyanBruner

    RyanBruner

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    Joe:

    I'm not sure I totally understand, but I'll study your pictures more and see if I can figure it out.

    Your last picture there looks closest to what I'm trying to accomplish in that there is a wall BELOW a bunch of stuff with nothing above it to nail into. In that picture, how are you securing the wall, aside from the far right end? It looks somewhat freestanding. But maybe there is something I don't see?
     
  7. Oct 25, 2008 #7

    Square Eye

    Square Eye

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    In your picture, you show your plumbing behind the ductwork. Box your ductwork level across, all the way to the wall. You will need a small header against the wall to rest your 2x's on. This is a great opportunity :D to use concrete anchors to fasten a pressure treated 1x or 2x to the basement wall, then you can set the header's front 2x flush with the front of the wall. Shim between these 2x's and fasten the header together.

    Drill the header for the fasteners first, then position it where it will be, mark the holes and drill for the anchors with a hammer drill. There are a TON of anchor types and lengths... Check out your local Hardware store to see what's available in your area and drill the holes according to the recommended drill size.
     
  8. Oct 25, 2008 #8

    spaz2965

    spaz2965

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    I have it nailed in on the right and on the left I have it attached to the steel. Not shown in the picture is I also put 2x's where I could up to floor joist and then nailed the to plate to it. That room is a mechanical room with a 4/8 bi-swing which means there are two 2/4 door with ball catches. The first pic witch isn't that clear has a block nailed to wall that supports wall. 100_0331.jpg

    100_0099.jpg
     
  9. Oct 25, 2008 #9

    RyanBruner

    RyanBruner

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    Thanks. Anchoring directly into the wall didn't occur to me. (Duh!) I have Tapcons, which I'm using to attach the baseplate to the floor, so I can use the same in the walls. I wasn't planning on boxing in any ductwork or any ceiling work at all at this point until later, since I have decided exactly how I'm going to do my ceilings. I have a very low basement (7' 2"), so I have to decide the best way to handle things...but I see why doing what you're saying makes sense to do it now...at least for that section.


    Joe:

    What did you use to attach to the steel? While it doesn't apply to this specific situation, there is another place I'm coming to where that might be handy.


    Thanks, again, to both of you. Very helpful.
     
  10. Oct 25, 2008 #10

    spaz2965

    spaz2965

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    I have a hilti gun that shoots nails into it but you may drill and use self tapping screws. Hope this helps.

    Joe~~
     

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