Opening up my kitchen, partially removing wall

Discussion in 'Walls and Ceilings' started by maxdad118, Aug 12, 2017.

  1. Aug 12, 2017 #1

    maxdad118

    maxdad118

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    We are wanting to remove some of our kitchen wall to create a more open feel with some bar stool seating and storage cabinets. Pretty sure it's load bearing and have a friend coming by to verify. It will only be about 5 ft of wall removal so my question is this- do I or should I absolutely need to get an engineer involved? It would not be flush installation but drop down the same as the entry way, trying to keep it simple but structurally sound. It would be from the left edge of the range to the opening of entryway. That is a mirror on the wall, not a pass thru opening��

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    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017
  2. Aug 12, 2017 #2

    Snoonyb

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    If your CJ splice over this wall and/or if there are any roof braces that land on this wall, it's a bearing wall.

    From the left side of the range to a framed structural post, between the new opening and the existing.


    You should be able to permit this without having to have an eng. involved and the support for the ceilings is quite routine and simple.

    How are you going to address the venting of the range?
     
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  3. Aug 12, 2017 #3

    maxdad118

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    We inherited the house this way and plan on a hood when we remodel the kitchen, too many fish to fry with this 1950's house.
     
  4. Aug 12, 2017 #4

    maxdad118

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    CJ splice? Center Joint?��
     
  5. Aug 13, 2017 #5

    Snoonyb

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    The CJ may or may not be continuous over the wall. If they are continuous, depending upon their dimension, they may be within span standards. as I recall from previous threds, they are 2X6, which have an allowable span of 15'6". If their length to the next bearing point exceeds that, you'll need the 4X6 DF header.

    If they are not continuous and splice over this wall, you'll need the same header.

    You'll likely find that there is not a stud at the exact point to the left of the range you desire, requiring you to open the wall to the next stud in order to install the trimmer under the header.

    Here on the truly left coast you are required to vent gas fired cooking appliances.
     
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  6. Aug 13, 2017 #6

    maxdad118

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    I'm not hip to the talk...does CJ=center joint and what is DF??
     
  7. Aug 13, 2017 #7

    maxdad118

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    I'm aware of the venting of gas appliances..it will be tackled when the remodel happens.
     
  8. Aug 13, 2017 #8

    Snoonyb

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    CJ is an abbreviation for Ceiling Joists, and DF is for Douglas Fir, the lumber the house is assembled from.

    They may take exception to the "eventually" part of the remodel where the venting is concerned.
     
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  9. Aug 14, 2017 #9

    slownsteady

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    Before you stumble upon it, have you considered the kitchen cabinets that will be lost?
     
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  10. Aug 14, 2017 #10

    maxdad118

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    Yes, actually the 2 above are empty currently and really not functional. My wife can't reach anything except the lower shelf on the one above the range which was spices and such. All that got moved to a rack in our pantry. The one to the right of it is useless! It has a basket on the open shelf which was packed with cooking oils and stuff. Most got moved to the pantry. We plan on a more user friendly and versatil cabinet setup with floor to ceiling unit left of range and better use of space in cabinets to the right of range. I'm hoping we can get a hood unit that won't look to funky mounted to the drop down beam section once we open it up?
     
  11. Aug 14, 2017 #11

    nealtw

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    Opening a 5 ft opening isn't usually a problem Unless you find a double stud in there which might indicate a point load. Most time a double 63" 2x10 header would do. for insurance you could go double LVLs
    If you intend to make the door bigger by 5 ft, that would more serious.
     
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  12. Jan 14, 2018 #12

    maxdad118

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    Well, we are finally into it and decided to pay a little for a design layout. We hired a contractor to do the work and I’m glad we did. Aside from some limitations and inconveniences it will be worth it!
     
  13. Jan 14, 2018 #13

    maxdad118

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    Here’s day 1&2

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 19, 2018
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  14. Jan 14, 2018 #14

    bud16415

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    What the heck was that framing of the giant X all about?

    Looks like you are making progress.
     
  15. Jan 14, 2018 #15

    oldognewtrick

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    X marks the spot silly....that's the spot...
     
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  16. Jan 14, 2018 #16

    Snoonyb

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    The old form of dia. bracing.

    Probably a carryover from ballon framing.
     
  17. Jan 14, 2018 #17

    maxdad118

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    I’m assuming it had something to do with the load bearing? Our exterior wall was the same way. Built in late 1940’s, early 1950. I’m no carpenter :)
     
  18. Jan 14, 2018 #18

    Snoonyb

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    Clean. What's the header size, and is it Select DF or a glue-lam?
     
  19. Jan 14, 2018 #19

    Snoonyb

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    A predominance of framing carpenters, of the era, were east coast and midwest transplants, and for that matter, most of the building trades.
     
  20. Jan 14, 2018 #20

    maxdad118

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    Not sure what the beam is? Doesn’t look laminated but 1 solid beam? Will there be evidence of it being laminated? When I hear that term I think of 2 or more pieces and seams?
     

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