Painting Doors

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by eastwood, Jun 3, 2007.

  1. Jun 3, 2007 #1

    eastwood

    eastwood

    eastwood

    New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2007
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello to all of the door experts out there. I have a question about painting doors.

    I took all of my current doors (stained wood) and painted them all white. Yes, it's terrible looking, I know, but I don't have the money to buy doors with panels yet. Some of them, upon rehanging the door, are difficult to shut and/or open because of the added layer of paint. I understand why that is.

    I did, however, replaced two of the doors with brand new six-panel solid core doors. They were pre-primed so they just needed a coat of white paint. If I used the brush or roller method, I either get the streaks from the brush or the orange-peel texture from the roller. How in the world do the painters of the new houses I see all of the time get s completely nice smooth finish?

    On top of that, even the paint I put on the brand new doors made them too thick to close or open without rubbing some of the paint off -- mostly on the edge closest to the hinges and stopping trim.

    Any ideas? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Jun 4, 2007 #2

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,990
    Likes Received:
    4
    Welcome Eastwood:
    Doors are difficult to paint sometimes. It helps to thin the paint a little, use at least a 3" wide brush and keep overlapping the strokes to blend them. A good quality brush will help too; I'm not talking about spending a ton of money, I like the One-Coater brushes from Wal-Mart.
    Many of the pros use a sprayer to do doors; that can be even more troublesome though because of run, orange peel effect or skips. Only a person who has done some spraying before should attempt it.
    Your problem with the paint rubbing off is called Hinge-Bound. It can be corrected by removing the hinges from the door, filling the screw holes with golf tees, matches or round toothpics, cut the mortise 1/16th or less deeper, position the hinges fruther in on the door (away from the hinge pin), drill new pilot holes and re-screw the hinge.
    Glenn
     

Share This Page