Pex in Exterior Wall

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum' started by harborremodel, Sep 6, 2019.

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  1. Sep 6, 2019 #1

    harborremodel

    harborremodel

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    I'm planning a kitchen remodel and moving a sink and some cabinets to an exterior facing wall. I know that installing supply lines in an exterior wall comes with its own issues so I'm wondering what's best practice here? Do most guys stop short of the wall and have the supplies come up through the cabinet base?
     
  2. Sep 6, 2019 #2

    nealtw

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    Coming up thru the floor is what code here calls for now, changed to this just a few years ago. It is the safer way to go.
    Now we are seeing cupboards built with the back wall forward a few inches to hide those pipes.
     
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  3. Sep 6, 2019 #3

    Snoonyb

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    Around here, only jack-leg laborers install plumbing outside the wall cavity.
     
  4. Sep 6, 2019 #4

    aNYCdb

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    In my hood its against code to put plumbing in exterior walls. As you mentioned (and nealtw seconded) come up through the floor if possible.
     
  5. Sep 6, 2019 #5

    bud16415

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    What’s under the floor? Basement, Slab, Crawl space/ heated/ unheated?


    If it is a basement that doesn’t freeze and unfinished it is pretty simple to run straight thru the floor and base of the cabinet. If you are cool do it in the back out of the way of where the trash can will go. If you are jack-legged go for the easy to drill spot right in the front.
    :good luck:
     
  6. Sep 8, 2019 #6

    nealtw

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    You don't deal with frozen pipes.
     
  7. Sep 9, 2019 #7

    hornetd

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    The Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC), which rules the work of the plumbers in my neck of the woods, would never pass any new water plumbing in an exterior wall under any circumstances.

    The WSSC is a very conservative agency. They will not even allow plastic water service laterals. They were early adopters of the first plastic piping and as the old hands will remember that was a mistake they do not wish to repeat. All of the plastic laterals that they allowed failed in a very short time.

    They now except Pex and CPVC in interior piping but they will have nothing to do with plastic underground because of it's early history. They are quite clear that no form of plastic will be allowed for any pressurized piping until that type of plastic has many years of successful use elsewhere with water utilities which have the same water chemistry that they have.

    The plastics industry brought suit but to no avail. The documented history of the previous failures with plastics produced by those same manufacturers, who swore at the time that it was the greatest thing since sliced bread, has been very convincing to the courts.

    --
    Tom Horne
     
  8. Sep 12, 2019 #8

    MrMiz

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    +1 to installing the pluming in the cabinet. I have a house build in 1905 that had the pluming in the exterior wall when I purchased it. I have since moved it out of the wall and into the cabinets or to a different wall as projects allow. I did try converting to PEX in wall and that worked for 99% of the year until we would get 1 or so weeks below zero and then it would freeze solid. It didn't break, but it was completely blocked. It seems like most of the times PEX can expand enough to prevent the rupture, but it's still not acceptable to have water blocked off to half the house so I pulled it out of the wall and put it in the cabinet. I would also recommend if you can to have a line of your heating source (air duct in my case) run into the cabinet. That's solve almost all my problems... other than renter's setting their Nest thermostats to below 50 degrees. Which is a totally different problem.
     

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