Plank sub floor HELP

Discussion in 'Flooring' started by y-townxj, Oct 20, 2010.

  1. Oct 20, 2010 #1

    y-townxj

    y-townxj

    y-townxj

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    I recently pulled up the flooring in the bathroom of my house. Because I noticed there was some noticeble soft spots. There are a few planks that are rotted, so heres my question. How can I replace the rotted portions of the planks without removing the whole plank.

    Heres some of the options, that are running through my mind

    A. cut out the bad spots and lay down 3/4 plywood over the entire floor, just like a non plank subfloor is done.

    B. cut out the bad spots, and put in new planks from joist to joist for maximum support

    Any help appreciated thanks :beer:
     
  2. Oct 20, 2010 #2

    DrHicks

    DrHicks

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    I'd go "B."

    You don't have to replace the entire plank. Just cut it at the nearest joists to the rotted area. Replace what you removed, secure it, and put your 3/4" plywood over the top.

    It's not worth messing around with a soft floor, ESPECIALLY if you're going to install ceramic or porcelain tile.
     
  3. Oct 25, 2010 #3

    y-townxj

    y-townxj

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    Thanks for the info, I have a rotted spot in the corner of the room where the planks go under the wall. Should I just cut the planks off, as close to the wall as possible. Then just build out from the wall with some 2x4's so I have somthing to secure the new planks to. Sorry if this is hard to fallow any help is appreciated thanks
     
  4. Oct 26, 2010 #4

    Jaz

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    Ceramic Tile Pro - retired

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    Yes do that, you have to have blocking under the ends of all planks. May want to use something bigger than 2x4's tho. Then install new underlayment grade plywood fastened into the planks only and continue. What will you be installing? It makes a difference how you prepare the floor.

    Jaz
     
  5. Oct 26, 2010 #5

    y-townxj

    y-townxj

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    I am unsure possibly ceramic tile
     
  6. Oct 26, 2010 #6

    Ben8n

    Ben8n

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    You should also take some mortar and put a layer of it down over the wooden floor and put the hardibacker over it to make sure there is no air bubbles or uneven spots in the floor. Make sure you use hardibacker screws to reason being is there is a corrisive additive to hardibacker that will eat threw drywall screws when you screw the floor down work from the center out to help push any extra mortar out from underneath. Put in mesh tape and put a thin layer of mortar over the seems then you have a prepped floor for tile. DO NOT go light on the screws either.
     
  7. Oct 26, 2010 #7

    samfloor

    samfloor

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    gotogregg, Mr Home Depot guy. If they are installing ceramic, they need to know deflection. Also they need 2 layers of plywood or plank and one layer of plywood to equal at least 1 1/4 inch. And CBU adds no structural strength.
     

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