Please help. Is this a structural issue?

Discussion in 'Framing and Foundation' started by RMC41714, Aug 18, 2019.

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  1. Aug 18, 2019 #1

    RMC41714

    RMC41714

    RMC41714

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    Hi everyone, I have recently purchased a home on Long Island New York that is not to far from the ocean. It is an older home that was built in 1961. Recently I have noticed that there Are a lot of wall cracks in the house. Some of them appear to have been previously repaired or covered up. As of now, the foundation doesn’t seem to be bowing or have any cracks. However I do have hardwood floors that are uneven and sloped in some places. Any advice if this is more of a foundation issue , or normal house settling? Thanks so much in advance.

     
  2. Aug 18, 2019 #2

    RMC41714

    RMC41714

    RMC41714

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    AB89B1AA-9FEB-41E0-821D-9849CA5A4D1F.jpeg 728A18BB-B642-42EA-88DF-4B89EC67FC00.jpeg
    728A18BB-B642-42EA-88DF-4B89EC67FC00.jpeg Two more pics . One is a previously unnoticed crack in basement wall starting at basement window, and other is diagonal crack from top of door.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2019
  3. Aug 19, 2019 #3

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Settling usually happens in the first year or two and repairs even ugly ones usually stay repaired unless there is more movement over time.
    Footing depth compared to frost depth is a good thing to consider.
    If the frost depth is 36" and your foundation is at 34", it may only freeze to that depth every few years and would only move things a bit.
    The next could be clay soil under the foundation that swells and shrinks depending on moisture content.
    So really the trick is to figure out why the house has moved and is it still moving .
    Houses can be leveled from under it but that is pointless if the real problem is not solved.
    I would do a detail drawing of the crawlspace or basement and set up a laser so it can be seen from most of the basement.
    And measure from the laser line up to the subfloor ever 5 or 6 ft along the perimeter wall and the center walls if you have them.
    Record all the readings on the plan.
    Check that again when the ground is wet when ever your rainy season is. Any changes then would indicate a drainage and clay issue.
    If it is a frost depth issue, sometimes you can raise the dirt level outside or bury insulation foam board under the dirt to give it more protection. You would check what the code is and try to figure what depth you have.

    The detailed drawing with elevations would also be used if you were to jack it up and level it.
     

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