Plumbing cuts through multiple studs. Is ok?

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by redshift, Jun 22, 2014.

  1. Jun 22, 2014 #1

    redshift

    redshift

    redshift

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    My kitchen remodel is in progress. After ripping out existing cabinets we found that the plumbing for the sink drain cuts through a total of 7 studs, more than 50% through each (see photos). Contractor and I were originally worried that these were load supporting -- why else use 5 together? But contractor went into the attic, and said based on rafters this is not load bearing. Consequently they are going to leave the existing situation. Next room has vaulted ceilings, and there is quite a bit of structure in the attic to support/implement that.

    Should I replace the studs and somehow route the plumbing around, or is it ok as pictured?

    More information needed to be sure?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2014
  2. Jun 22, 2014 #2

    Jungle

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    Why wouldn't you fix it? Are you putting a dubai there? I would hammer some other 2x4's on it for sure. Try and fill the hole back up with wood.
     
  3. Jun 22, 2014 #3

    redshift

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    The new sink will be in the same location ( a peninsula which comes out at 45 degress from the end of the wall there), and so the PVC that is there now, pictured, is still needed to reach the basement stack. I guess. This is outside my area of expertise (software eng) so I appreciate and ideas/opinions/thoughts. Thanks.
     
  4. Jun 22, 2014 #4

    redshift

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    I guess my main question is: Is ok to leave it, no big deal? Or is it something that 100% should be fixed?
     
  5. Jun 22, 2014 #5

    Jungle

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    It could be nothing just some 2x4 they put there to hold the back of sink up. Should open the dry wall up and see where it goes, it could be the king studs holding the roof up too.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2014
  6. Jun 23, 2014 #6

    CallMeVilla

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    Your structure is compromised. That many adjoining studs is carrying weight to some point in the basement from someplace above. I would certainly restore the structure!

    Is there no possible realignment of your project to replace the lost support? There does not look like a place to just sister some new 2x4s onto that mess. Can you access the same spot by bringing the drain up from the basement on the right side of the clustered 2x4s then re-route back into the basement stack? If you have to, build a plumbing soffit downstairs to hide the fix (Make it look like a column).
     
  7. Jun 23, 2014 #7

    nealtw

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    It's a safe bet to assume the contractor is wrong, repair that mess and bring the pipe out of the wall, it will be at the back of the cupboard below the shelf, no harm .
    Any time you find more than one stud nailed together, it will be barring. You have a beam running to the right to support the ceiling in the other room, my guess.
     
  8. Jun 24, 2014 #8

    redshift

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    Thanks for the responses all.

    The basement is not finished. The pipe going into the basement pictured above is the one closest to the camera in this picture below. The previous, and new, sink, will be to the left of that joist, you can see the water pipes. The five studs come down near the drain's entrance to the basement, so about 3.5 feet from the gray support beam you see.


    [​IMG]


    It is hard to see in the original picture, but the drain also goes up, inside the wall, to the attic. I guess whatever new solution we come up with will have to maintain that. The sink, being in a peninsula not abutting the wall, some plumbing in the wall will be necessary. Maybe it can be in the new 12" extension to the wall there (original picture, with no drywall)-- added because the new cabinets will extend further along that wall.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2014
  9. Jun 24, 2014 #9

    nealtw

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    Yep that is proof enough. Then what you have will be fine the way it is. ;)
     
  10. Jun 24, 2014 #10

    CallMeVilla

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    Your pics make it clear you can re-route the drain to the right in the stud bay. Here is a pic of my concept. You can lose that destroyed stud issue and have an easy way to go. Just punch up fro the basement about 24" to the right and BINGO!

    MESS.jpg
     
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  11. Jun 24, 2014 #11

    redshift

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    @callmevilla -- Thanks for the picture and idea, I like it.

    Strange that the five studs were there but not over the support beam below, or even directly over a joist. I hope that itself was not a mistake in the original construction. There was no sink or anything attached to them on that wall. They do align with the peak of the vaulted ceiling in the next room.

    This is a 13 year old house built in a neighborhood with 100 other house at about the same time.

    Anyway, thanks for the input.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2014
  12. Jun 24, 2014 #12

    CallMeVilla

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    Well ... NOW you raise another issue. Perhaps it WAS a framing mistake! How could the peak of the ceiling be supported in mid-air? Neal is pretty good at figuring these things out ... I cannot believe five studs were framed-in for no good reason ... not even over a joist?

    Suspicious.

    I wonder what other guys think ...
     
  13. Jun 24, 2014 #13

    nealtw

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    Let the guessing begin.:confused::beer:

    Could be backing for a half wall or full wall in the origanal kitchen. When homeowner or designers move thing just an inch or two the framer may just add studs to make it work. On occasionally have righten notes on things like that. Things like "this is for you to figure out" or just "good luck"
     
  14. Jun 27, 2014 #14

    inspectorD

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    It is interesting for sure with those 5 studs installed the way they are:confused:.
    It may be that the plan got changed for cost? and the vaulted ceiling is spreading at the walls...
    Or it could be that there is actually something being supported like a beam in the ridge, and you just do not see it.
    I would reroute the pipe as suggested.
     
  15. Jul 8, 2014 #15

    redshift

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    Here is what it looks like with the drywall removed:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Jul 8, 2014 #16

    nealtw

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    Yes, now it makes sence.;)
    These are changes made after framing to the plan,
    The wall needs to be 4 1/2" bigger.
    No, it still needs to be 1ft bigger.
    Oh crap, add another foot to make that cupboard work.

    This happens all the time.
     

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