Preparing my oil painted walls for primer

Discussion in 'Painting Forum' started by majorlazer, Mar 8, 2016.

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  1. Mar 8, 2016 #1

    majorlazer

    majorlazer

    majorlazer

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    I am currently renovating a home built in 1987. All interior walls are painted with an oil based paint. After researching online, it suggested to de-gloss the paint by sanding it to create a better service for the primer to adhere to. Well I began de-glossing the walls, but it appears that the paint is not smooth and has hills and valleys. I was under the impression i should be lightly sanding, but it seems that this light sanding only de-glosses the top layer of the paint (hill), and leaves an untouched pore-like surface (valley) beneath it.

    I have zinsser bulls eye 1-2-3 primer and am wondering if this is a well enough prepared surface for priming? Do i need to skim coat the walls to fill in the pores?
    Please provide me with some guidance.

    Thank you
     
  2. Mar 8, 2016 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

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  3. Mar 8, 2016 #3

    majorlazer

    majorlazer

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  4. Mar 8, 2016 #4

    bud16415

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    I have slipped a piece of carpet pad under the mesh in my drywall pole sander to give it a little flex. I wouldn’t worry too much that’s a good primer. Give it a few licks with the sander and paint away.
     
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  5. Mar 8, 2016 #5

    majorlazer

    majorlazer

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    Thank you very much!
     
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  6. Mar 10, 2016 #6

    DFBonnett

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    The 1-2-3 is a satisfactory primer. If you can stand the smell, an oil based or pigmented shellac primer, either being more aggressive than a water based, would be a better choices, however.
     
  7. Mar 11, 2016 #7

    kok328

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    Use an oil-based, odorless primer (Zinsser or Kilz are reputable). These products claim to grab onto most surfaces and create enough "tooth" for painting, without sanding first.
    You can sand down the high spots "ropes" ahead of time.
     
  8. Mar 14, 2016 #8

    chrisn

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    I disagree with the above posts. The 123 is all you need .
     

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