Pressure Tank Design

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Eddie_T

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Since pressure tank bladders do not last forever wouldn't it be nice if bladder tanks were made such that a bladder could be replaced w/o removing and re-plumbing the tank? In my mind I see a removable top with a diaphragm or at least an accessible plate that facilitated easy removal and replacement of the bladder and reverse the process using the bladder for air vice water containment.
 

bud16415

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It would be nice but likely the tank would be twice the cost and the replacement parts plus labor would be more than the old tank costs.

At my old house I had just a plain air control tank that has lasted 40 years with no bladder. About once a year you need to add some air is all. If you have a compressor handy it was a snap. I mostly just turned the pump off, shut a couple valves and opened a couple one to let air in on the top and one at the bottom to let water out. open bottom one first. The bottom one was run to my sump pump. I would drain the tank down also getting rid of any build up in the tank then when it was full of air shut both valves and turn the pump on and open the valves to the house. Takes about five minutes.

Never saw the need for a bladder tank. Air over water.
 

Eddie_T

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A tank at twice the price might not be so bad if the homeowner could replace the bladder. Plumbers charge exorbitant fees for their work, far more than the cost of a tank. I don't know if my bladder is gone or not, I will keep a watch on what's going on and recharge the tank as necessary. Bladder tanks were introduced so tanks could be smaller.There are a lot of things we can keep going that the average homeowner might not understand.
 

Eddie_T

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Good illustration, now visualize my concept where the bladder is for the air instead of the water and can be replaced w/o impacting any plumbing.
 

SARG

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From the deep-dark web .......... Not a new idea

The Flotec 35-Gallon steel tank by Pentair is a compact pressure tank designed to accommodate a small home. Pre-charged with 40 PSI of nitrogen, this tank is ready for quick and easy installation. With a replaceable bladder, the Flotec tank is a worthwhile investment with little maintenance cost.
 

SARG

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Numerous videos on HOW TO .............. but I imagine the problem is they charge almost as much for the insert as the entire new tank would cost. At Flotec a u20 bladder is $263 & a Craftsman is $219.
I understand your concept is to structure the tank so "you could pop the top" without unhooking the plumbing.
I like the water within a bladder to prevent or at least slow down the deterioration of the steel tank.


 
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Eddie_T

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It appears that Wellmate beat me to the draw. The also have a quick connect to the plumbing.

 
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SARG

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Hey ... That's the tank I got rid of last November. Glad it's gone.
 

SARG

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It was 14 years in service when I replaced everything in the system.
Had several indications of erratic operation and excessive pump cycling that all pointed to the tank and sure enough when I pulled it out I could shake it and hear water sloshing around within the top portion. Ending up replacing the well pump ( leaking check valve after 28 years but the pump worked fine ) and also the water heater ( also 14 years with a rusting cold water entry nipple that had a minor leak and when I pulled it out discovered the bottom was rusting through ......... caused by my not realizing how critical replacing the anode rod is ) All a little pricey but the system should be set for a couple decades.
 
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Eddie_T

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I read that the problem with bladder tanks including air bladders is that they fail at the wrinkles. Flex-Lite diaphragm tanks were recommended but the cost is prohibitive unless they last forever.
 

bud16415

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A tank at twice the price might not be so bad if the homeowner could replace the bladder. Plumbers charge exorbitant fees for their work, far more than the cost of a tank. I don't know if my bladder is gone or not, I will keep a watch on what's going on and recharge the tank as necessary. Bladder tanks were introduced so tanks could be smaller.There are a lot of things we can keep going that the average homeowner might not understand.
The big advantage of bladder tanks is for the non DIY homeowner. That is what most people are today. For me the size of the tank being larger is no big deal. The bigger the better as it will cycle my pump on and off fewer times. For the average guy now a days to have to go to the basement once or twice a year and add air into his tank or drain and fill it isn’t likely to happen and if they have to call someone out to do it they will complain about the labor cost. If I had a tank now like I had in my old place I would buy a $36 HF pancake compressor and leave it sitting right there to air the tank. I have one I bought when my large compressor went down to fill some tires and it works great, slow but great. Still I would have to take 5 minutes a couple times a year to do it.

Most people don’t change their cars oil or sharpen their mower blades today and they also don’t mess with air tanks. :coffee:
 

Eddie_T

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I don't have a basement so my tank is in my garage and needs to be small. I'm thinking of a cycle stop valve so I can go even smaller, so a bladder or diaphragm is my only option. My 35 gallon tank sits under the electrical panel in a corner of the garage. My original tank got a surge of air with every cycle and had a float valve to bleed off the excess but when I had to replace my system they no longer used those and I had to get it done in one day so I couldn't order any parts.
 

Eddie_T

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I have one kennel hydrant and two yard hose bibs teed off my supply pipe prior to the well tank. When the freeze warns are over I'll uncover my well head (leaf pile over it for insulation) to see if I have room to install a CSV in the concrete tile. If not I might be able to find an extension ring to add another 12". That would place the CSV about 100 ft away from the well tank. It would also place my underground piping on the 50 psi side of the CSV. An additional benefit if this is feasible is no plumbing rework in the well tank area which is low to the floor and crowded with a maze of pipes and fittings.
 

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