quick question

Discussion in 'Electrical and Wiring' started by hoarea, Feb 7, 2008.

  1. Feb 7, 2008 #1

    hoarea

    hoarea

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    how many pulg-in can u have on one 15amp breaker with 14/2 wire?
     
  2. Feb 7, 2008 #2

    guyod

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    It really as more to do with your electrical load than the number of oulets.

    a 15 amp breaker can will trip after 1800 watts. that could be 20 lamps or one space heater. it depends where the outlets are going.

    If you explain what you are trying to do or your problem maybe we can be more help
     
  3. Feb 7, 2008 #3

    hoarea

    hoarea

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    i am going to run new wire to a bedroom that has knob and tubing now. it is going to have at least 6 plugins. there is only one right now. u can never have enough. so there will be a computer and just everyday bedroom stuff
     
  4. Feb 7, 2008 #4

    guyod

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    Your putting 6 outlets in one bedroom? One breaker for one bedroom is very good. if you didnt buy your supplies you can use a 20amp 12 gage wire and be able to run that to more rooms in the future.
     
  5. Feb 7, 2008 #5

    speedy petey

    speedy petey

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    To answer the original question, there is NO limit to the number of receptacles on a circuit in a residence.
    We just use common sense and take into account the intended use when figuring circuits.
     
  6. Feb 8, 2008 #6

    triple D

    triple D

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    Just make sure you run a 14-2 not a 14-3. All power in a bedroom must be on a arc-fault breaker, and you can not split circuits on arc faults. Commonly I wire 2 bedrooms, lights and plugs on one 15 amp circuit. If you think you might have a laser printer or other office type things, just do only the plugs in one room on a circuit, this will keep load down to accommodate your demand. good luck, and remember we're all pullin' fer ya
     
  7. Feb 8, 2008 #7

    speedy petey

    speedy petey

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    There are several manufacturers making two-pole AFCI breakers already, and more will follow. So a multi-wire branch circuit (shared neutral) is no problem with a newer panel.
    Old panels and fuse boxes are another story.
     
  8. Feb 8, 2008 #8

    maine845

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    A general rule is as follows: Figure 180 VA (watts) per outlet. Using the formula P=IxE P=watts, I=amps and E=volts P=15ampsx120volts=1800VA, now divide 180VA into 1800VA and 10 is the general number that I put on a circuit. This will work the same for a 20 amp circuit as well. I recommend you stay away from a multiwire circuit because it is wired on a double pole circuit breaker and if one side causes a short and trips, the other non affected circuit will trip and thus leaves you in the dark. I teach an Electrical Course and am an active Master Electrician.
     
  9. Feb 9, 2008 #9

    speedy petey

    speedy petey

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    Unless you are under the 2008 NEC this is NOT a code requirement.
    Also, for relatively newly wired circuit, when was the last time you tripped a breaker?
    In being in my (1975) house for the last 15 years, I have NEVER tripped a breaker.
    Sorry, I DO NOT buy into that whole "It will leave you in the dark" philosophy.
     
  10. Feb 9, 2008 #10

    kok328

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    and then they invented the power strip....
    Now how many outlets?
     
  11. Feb 10, 2008 #11

    triple D

    triple D

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    Hoarea,
    To my knowlege you may not wire two arc fault circuits on a 3-wire cable. Sure there are 2-pull afci but you may not have two circuits on a single pull double throw breaker that land in different places. Please wire your room with 2 wire romex or if you need two circuits 14-4 will suit you, or 12ga but 20 amp arc faults cost a bit more. A 2pull arc fault would be for a 240volt load,I.E. a heater or something. Good luck!
     
  12. Feb 10, 2008 #12

    speedy petey

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    Triple, I hate to sound confrontational, but are you even an electrician?


    First off, there is NO such thing as a SPDT breaker. There are single, double and three pole breakers.
    You most certainly CAN have two circuits (meaning one multi-wire circuit) from a double-pole AFCI breaker. This is SPECIFICALLY what 2-pole AFCIs are made for.



    He DOES NOT need 14/4. And 15a AFCIs cost the same as 20a AFCIs.


    A 240v load does NOT even require AFCI protection.
     
  13. Feb 10, 2008 #13

    Parrothead

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    Probably, but not necessarily. WI has not yet adopted that particular code (could change in '08) so you might want to check the code in PA.
     
  14. Feb 12, 2008 #14

    triple D

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    "To my knowledge," means just that. I guess you got me on a technicality, although if I were pulling in two new circuits and they were arc fault circuits, they would not be on a 14-3. The cost of two wires and two breakers is still far less than a two pole arc fault. The money you save by using 14-3 on the average home run might be around $15 for a 70-80 ft. run. The increase from 2 single pole breakers to 1 two pole breaker could be as much as $75 depending on brand and store. I'm all about getting the job done correctly and as inexpensively as possible.

    Hoarea, I sure hope you found the answer you were looking for somewhere in here, and maybe a good laugh or two. Good Luck...
     
  15. Feb 12, 2008 #15

    speedy petey

    speedy petey

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    "...far less.." "...$75...." I don't think so.
    A double pole AFCI is about the same cost as two single poles.
     
  16. Feb 12, 2008 #16

    glennjanie

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    Hey Dan:
    Speedy Petey is a thoroughly experienced electrician who knows what he is talking about. I often skip over the electrical questions and leave them for him. If I answer one, it is because I know for sure I'm right.
    You guys play nice now, we don't need any spatting on here.
    Glenn
     
  17. Feb 21, 2008 #17

    JoeD

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    The OP is in Canada. The limit is 12 outlets per circuit. That includes lights, receptacles, fans, etc.
     
  18. Feb 21, 2008 #18

    speedy petey

    speedy petey

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    You're right, and I knew that, and I generally notice a poster's location.

    It is possible that this was added after the thread was started. If not I apologize.
     

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