Radiator - which way to turn to disconnect radiator

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afjes_2016

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I need to disconnect this radiator so I can get to the plumbing behind the sheet rock.

I believe I have to hold "B" still with a wrench and also turn "A" with a wrench at the same time. Which way do I turn "A" with the pipe wrench - in direction of "22" or "44"?

I tried both ways but it won't move.

Thanks :)


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billshack

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in the direction of 44, If i was doing the job, i would heat the pipe almost until i could light a cigarette of the pipe ,. the wrenches should be about
18- 24 inches ,
 

kok328

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If you turn A in 44 direction you'll have to hold "C" (the valve body). "B" is a reducing bushing.
 

afjes_2016

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Thanks for the info

Bill: When you say heat the "pipe" do you mean the section that is "A" and "B" - I would assume heating that section will help move the nut "A" from "B".
OK, on wrench sizes.

kok328 - Do you mean I should have another wrench and have someone hold that wrench on the valve assembly to keep it from moving while breaking loose nut "A"?

When I reconnect the radiator do I have to use any pipe dope or anything like that on the threads of "A"?
 

Snoonyb

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I think that this was addresses in a previous thread, where I corrected my advise from the original suggestion of, your, "A & B" question, too pull up on A, while holding the valve with another wrench, which kok has reiterated.

If you heat the union nut A, and there are non-metallic parts in the valve, they will be damaged, so, if you can shut off the supply at the source, and drain the system the valve can be disassembled, and just the valve body held to prevent damage at it's connection to the supply line.
 

afjes_2016

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.

Yes snoonyb you are correct in referring to the previous thread of mine. My reasoning for asking again but this time with pics in a separate thread is I was not sure from the directions given me as to what to place the wrench on and what to pull/push on the radiator. That thread was actually covering several questions and it was getting confusing for me to follow especially at 65 yo. I now am confident as to what to hold and what to pull on to loosen that part to disconnect the radiator.

Thanks for the heads up about non-metal parts in the valve assembly which may melt if heat is applied. I won't heat but will have someone hold the valve stem with another wrench.

I plan on draining the system at the boiler. Some water will more than likely be in the radiator still so I will expect to get a wet floor. I will have towels down in case. I will also have to place a jack under the radiator to help hold it in place and move it once it is disconnected. No way I can lift it even with the help of someone else. My back is shot already.

.
 

billshack

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yes one wrench on A
another wrench on b in the opposite direction.
heat the nut part A very hot , you want it to expand .
 

mabloodhound

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'A' is not threaded onto "B" it is simply a slip joint. 'A' is actually threaded onto the valve so '44' is the correct direction. There aren't any non metal parts in the joint so heating is OK.
 

afjes_2016

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Thanks for all the suggestions!!

The radiator is now disconnected. Was not too difficult. I had a friend give me his hands also and together we got it off the valve. We did not have to heat up the area first. That radiator was only in place for about 2 years so I guess it was not that hard to remove.

Thanks everyone!! :thumb:
Now I can concentrate on working on the plumbing behind the sheet rock. Urgh!!
 

Bvgary

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Nice thread, helped me a lot to replace my radiator. I recently ordered a new one and I thought that would be easy to change it, but I struggled a lot, so I decided to search and found this thread. Btw the groove was rusty, so I had to replace the hot water tube. But finally, I have my new grey stylish designer radiators. Compared to my old rusty ones, this looks really expensive, but in fact, it is not. Read More here if you are in a search of cheap, but qualitative radiators.
 

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