Removing veneer?

Discussion in 'Decorating and Design' started by montela, May 20, 2009.

  1. May 20, 2009 #1

    montela

    montela

    montela

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    Want to refinish a night table. It has a veneer coating which has cracked and chipped. I'd like to get it off.
    Any suggestions,
     
  2. Aug 29, 2009 #2

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

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    Welcome Montela:
    A commercial, drum sander would do the trick. You may find one at a local cabinet shop or vocational school shop.
    Glenn
     
  3. Sep 1, 2009 #3

    kwmainer

    kwmainer

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    Depending on the item, I have (in the past) been advised to either leave it alone, or rewet it - and dry it flat, or in extremes patch it very carefully. I was also advised to find a ehem... antique dealer, since many times antique dealers 'fix' antique furniture before selling it.

    I mean no disrespect or censor in that statement. Disclaimer: it is um, poor business practice to repair or replace antique veneer and then sell the piece as 'original'. But, realistically, it is done quite a bit by either the original owner or by someone else. nuff said.

    Fact is, the antique dealers in your area may be able to 'refer' you to someone who knows how to er... 'fix' it. And you can get some pointers from them.

    I've done something similar to a arts & crafts sideboard that has been in my family for 3 generations. I'm not selling it... and yes... <smile> it now looks pretty dang nice... :D

    Of course, if your piece is not an antique and if it's not particle board underneath the veneer and if it's really veneer and not some cheap laminate plastic garbage... then get the sander. Go carefully...
     
  4. Sep 1, 2009 #4

    kwmainer

    kwmainer

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    Hey Glenn...

    I meant to ask you: I assume you sand off the veneer adhesive/glue too. natch. And assuming you'll want to re-veneer the piece... what kind of glue/cement would you suggest for a humid, hot sub tropical climate like Florida? I have another piece that I want to actually replace a top portion of the veneer (major chips missing). But the veneer work will be curved around the top. The glue needs to hold. Suggestions?
     
  5. Sep 2, 2009 #5

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

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    Hello KWMainer:
    The veneer work I have done was with carpenter's wood glue and extremely good clamping. I have a small table in the foyer (where it is sometimes really damp) and have had no trouble with the veneer top. BTW, I got an A on that table in college.
    Glenn
     
  6. Sep 2, 2009 #6

    kwmainer

    kwmainer

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    Thanks, Glenn

    Sometimes the old "tried and true" or the most common of fixes is still the best. I have Carpenter's glue... and good claps with leathers. Hum... Thanks for the tip..
     
  7. Oct 28, 2009 #7

    Superpack

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    My thought if it is the old hide glue, then a scraper should lift most of the veneer, and heat from a heat gun or household iron will loosen the rest.

    Best Regards,
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2009

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