Replacement overhead light with no existing ground...

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by Harryc, Mar 2, 2009.

  1. Mar 2, 2009 #1

    Harryc

    Harryc

    Harryc

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    I have just replaced an overhead light with a chandelier. The old light fixture did not have any sort of a ground, just two wires comming out of the ceiling. The new fixture functions, however I am concerned with not having any sort of ground. Is there some sort of safety that I can add to this existing fixture? Perhaps a new wall switch that would add protection of some sort?
     
  2. Mar 2, 2009 #2

    kok328

    kok328

    kok328

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    If there only two wires coming out of the box then there's not much you can do that would be worth all the effort. I wouldn't worry about it, a ceiling fixture isn't really in a high traffic area and/or something that someone should be touching on a regular basis. How long was the old fixutre there w/o a grounding problem?
     
  3. Mar 2, 2009 #3

    Harryc

    Harryc

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    Ok, heres what I did...tell me if you think this is sufficent.
    With the power on, I took one of those non-contact current sensors and found that any metal part of the chandelier would set it off.
    I then cut the power, and using a long copper wire I separated a collar on the fixture that screws apart and wrapped the wire around the threads. I tightened the collar back down, and then fished the wire through the all to a juction box that has armored cable. I then screwed the wire to that box.
    After flipping the breaker back on, the current sensor no longer goes off when placed around the chandeliers metal parts.
    Do you think that I what I did sufficiently grounded this chandelier?
     
  4. Mar 2, 2009 #4

    kok328

    kok328

    kok328

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    I stand corrected, I didn't realize running a separate ground wire was such an easy task for you. This usually involves insulation and drywall damage.
    Sounds like your properly grounded and to check this, you should be able to use a voltmeter to test between the new ground and the hot. You should see 120V (w/the power on) if your properly grounded.
     

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