Replacing Freezer Power Cord

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SavvyCat

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This question isn't so much for the house, but for an appliance in it. I accidentally broken off the grounding pin on the plug of my 7 c.f. chest freezer. I keep having to move it and I forgot to unplug it. I'd like to replace the power cord with a longer one, but wonder if there's a reason the cord is only 5 feet long.

I have this habit of saving cords from dead stuff, and have two possible replacements. One is from a carpet shampooer, and one is from a fluorescent light. I'm having trouble "decoding" the print on all the cords. The freezer one says (18AWG) 105ºC, and one of the replacements 3X18AWG 90ºC, and so on. Any tips?
 

bud16415

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I don’t know how large your freezer is or the gage wire it has powering it. You will want a wire of the same gage or a larger gage when replacing. Keep in mind the larger the gage the smaller the number. AWG12 is larger than AWG14 etc AWG18 being smaller than AWG14. The 3 in the number is the number of conductors inside the cable and 3 is what you will want. If you have something suitable then you could find where the wire is connected inside the freezer and replace it there with a different one. Length is a factor with resistance but would be anything to worry about if just adding a couple feet of length. You could also buy a 3 prong plug replacement and cut off the damaged end of your molded plug and replace it. Then if you needed more length you could use a heavy gage extension cord.
 

Sparky617

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Higher power consumption devices use shorter cords. Toaster ovens tend to have pretty short cords, same with coffee makers. You'd have to look at the tag on the freezer to determine it's power usage. I'd bet it is around 1500 watts, the max continuous load for a 15 amp circuit. I have a dedicated 20 amp outlet in my garage for a freezer but the plug to the freezer I had was a 15 amp plug. A 20 amp plug has one of the prongs turned 90 degrees to the other and will only fit in a 20 amp outlet.

Agree with Bud's comments about wire gauge for your freezer.
 

SavvyCat

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I don’t know how large your freezer is or the gage wire it has powering it. You will want a wire of the same gage or a larger gage when replacing. Keep in mind the larger the gage the smaller the number. AWG12 is larger than AWG14 etc AWG18 being smaller than AWG14. The 3 in the number is the number of conductors inside the cable and 3 is what you will want. If you have something suitable then you could find where the wire is connected inside the freezer and replace it there with a different one. Length is a factor with resistance but would be anything to worry about if just adding a couple feet of length. You could also buy a 3 prong plug replacement and cut off the damaged end of your molded plug and replace it. Then if you needed more length you could use a heavy gage extension cord.

I was going to replace the plug when I started thinking I need a couple more feet. It's a 15A outlet on a 20A circuit.
 

Sparky617

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kok328

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This question isn't so much for the house, but for an appliance in it. I accidentally broken off the grounding pin on the plug of my 7 c.f. chest freezer. I keep having to move it and I forgot to unplug it. I'd like to replace the power cord with a longer one, but wonder if there's a reason the cord is only 5 feet long.

I have this habit of saving cords from dead stuff, and have two possible replacements. One is from a carpet shampooer, and one is from a fluorescent light. I'm having trouble "decoding" the print on all the cords. The freezer one says (18AWG) 105ºC, and one of the replacements 3X18AWG 90ºC, and so on. Any tips?

3X18AWG = 3 conductor, 18 AWG, should work fine. The longer the cord the smaller the AWG you'll want, so moving up to a 14AWG is not a problem.
 

SavvyCat

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I'd replace the plug and maybe use one of these to give you a bit more flexibility in location. Use the shortest possible/heaviest duty extension cord.


I decided to go this route. Thank you! AND it gave me an idea what to do with the snipped cords I have. I ordered some outlet ends and will make those extension cords for a couple of other projects I have. Yer awesome!
 

afjes_2016

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Ah a plug. I have never heard someone refer to it as an outlet end.
Being an electrician we call them not an outlet but a receptacle.
When we respond to DIYers we try to stay with proper terminology so that when a DIYer asks questions we are sure of what they mean. The terms outlet and receptacle are used interchangeably but really have two different technical meanings. Sometimes if a DIYer uses an incorrect term but it is obvious as to what they are referring to then we don't ask for clarification but sometimes it is important that we do ask for clarification to prevent us from offering incorrect advise or guidance. We don't do it to be picky, we do it for safety and assurance.

It also helps a DIYer to learn proper termonology so that when they search the Net for answers to their questions they get more precise responses. Again, not to be picky.

See Here
===============================
Although all three terms are often used interchangeably to mean “that thing in the wall that you plug a cord into,” each has a different, specific meaning:

Outlet - The National Electrical Code (NEC) defines it as “a point on the wiring system at which current is taken to supply utilization equipment.” This would include a receptacle, but also could be a light fixture, appliance, ceiling fan, or smoke alarm.

Receptacle - “A contact device installed at the outlet for connection of an attachment plug,” according to the NEC. So, essentially, a receptacle is one type of outlet.

Receptacle Outlet - “An outlet where one or more receptacles are installed.” This is the technically correct name for what is pictured at the top of this page.

Attachment Plug - Usually referred to as simply a plug, it more formally described as an Attachment Plug by the NEC, and defined as “a device that, by insertion into a receptacle, establishes a connection between the conductors of the attached flexible cord and the conductors connected permanently to the receptacle.”

None of this is going to stop people from using the words receptacle, outlet, and plug to mean the same thing; but the difference is worth remembering when each one is used in the context of a building code.
 

SavvyCat

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That's what Home Depot called it. They other end is the plug, as you labors to 'splain it indicate.
 

afjes_2016

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That's what Home Depot called it. They other end is the plug, as you labors to 'splain it indicate.
Unfortunately Home Depot is not known for correct terminology or proper advise when it comes to electrical. Even on their website. Many times I have noticed errors on their website.

One day I was on chat with home depot (NOTE: Anyone reading this in the future never attempt to do this!! This is an example ONLY!!). I was curious to see how much these chat reps knew about electrical. Long story short the rep on chat with me advised that I could use a high quality multistrip receptacle to connect at least 3 space heaters each rated at 1,500 watts because the multistrip was rated for 600 volts and it would be safe (3 times 120v = 450 volts is what he said - he even said I would have some volts left over). No way would it ever be safe nor would it be safe even using a multistrip for even one space heater.
 
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