Replacing Prehung Front Entry Door in Stucco

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by o2284200, Jun 3, 2013.

  1. Jun 3, 2013 #1

    o2284200

    o2284200

    o2284200

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    What should I expect to be included on the labor end of installation of a single pre-hung front entry door in stucco? i.e. My first proposal includes: "Remove existing wood door and install owner;s door into opening. Secure with tapcons into existing block opening. Add jamb extensions to door along with new casing. Putty,prep and painting of jamb and door by others. Caulk exterior jamb at new stucco surface with white urethane caulking."

    ALSO:

    The threshold on the new pre-hung door is 3/4" shorter than my current threshold; 1.5" shorter, if you include the exterior molding strip. The 3rd pic down shows a pencil mark where the new threshold would reach, if I keep the new pre-hung door flush with walls on the inside. The 1st installer says I have 2 options but either way, I will lose the exterior molding strip & not be able to replace it:

    1) Keep the new pre-hung door flush with walls on the inside & fill in the gap left in the front with more stucco, which means I have to hire a stucco guy.
    2) Push the new pre-hung door forward to stucco and then add strips of wood on the inside to make it flush with the walls.

    All helpful thoughts & opinions are greatly appreciated, Thanks!

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2013
  2. Jun 3, 2013 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Two things to consider. You want the door to be a close to the wall surface so that the door can swing all the way open with out running into anything but you also want some of the hinge screws and stricker plate screws to be able to anchor into the substructure.
     
  3. Jun 4, 2013 #3

    Fireguy5674

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    If I am looking at the pictures correctly the original is an outswing door. Is the new unit an outswing as well or does it swing back into the house? If so putting extention jambs on the inside should not effect the swing of the door at all. It will just make the door sit a little forward in the opening. If the new door is an inswing and you want it to sit flush with the inside then why can't your guy install extension jambs on the outside of the door frame to take up your extra space before putting the door in the opening? There may be a valid reason I just can't tell from the pictures.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2013
  4. Jun 4, 2013 #4

    WindowsonWashington

    WindowsonWashington

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    I would specify and inswing so as to keep the components in towards the home and therefore more secure and not rusting.

    At that point, you can trim out the exterior jamb to stucco connection with any number of PVC trim pieces and you will not need a stucco repair aspect of the job.
     
  5. Jun 4, 2013 #5

    o2284200

    o2284200

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    Thanks! The original & new are both right out-swings. I'm still looking into it but I think out-swings are preferred or required; I believe it has something to do with being in a hurricane zone.
     
  6. Jun 4, 2013 #6

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    That's a reasonable point and with that in mind it is important to have the screws into the framing. You might consider an industrial steel door frame.
    They are adjustable to different wall thickness and the hinges are welded to the frame.
     
  7. Jun 7, 2013 #7

    o2284200

    o2284200

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    It appears that fiberglass doors are becoming very popular down here because steel rusts.
     
  8. Jun 7, 2013 #8

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    They really look good too.
     
  9. Jun 7, 2013 #9

    WindowsonWashington

    WindowsonWashington

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    +1


    Some of the newer grained fiberglass units are great looking.
     
  10. Jun 14, 2013 #10

    o2284200

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    Here's the new door I got at HD; it comes primed white. Also, I confirmed with local building dept that all ingress/egress doors must be outswing per Florida Building Code for High Wind Hurricane Zones (HWHZ)

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    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  11. Jun 14, 2013 #11

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    If you move the frame out to the stucco, you may not find anything for the sucurity screw for the hinges and stricker plate. As the door is inset it will never swing all the open anyway so I would install it flush with inside. The filler strip between the frame and the stucco may have to be custom cut, but this not really not a big deal.
    http://zenseeker.net/Randomness/HomeSecurity.htm
     
  12. Jun 17, 2013 #12

    o2284200

    o2284200

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    THANKS!
    Nice link!

    Any thoughts on trying to save the existing exterior molding, which sits between the jamb & the stucco by separating the jamb from the molding? Thus not disturbing the stucco at all.
     
  13. Jun 17, 2013 #13

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Find the nails and drive them right thru the molding

    punch.jpg
     
  14. Jun 17, 2013 #14

    WindowsonWashington

    WindowsonWashington

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    That or cut them from the backside.

    Be sure to cut the stucco loose from the door frame as mentioned before.
     
  15. Jun 17, 2013 #15

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    That's what he wants to avoid, the trim will be nailed to the framing and covered with stucco, if he uses a sawsall he will damage the trim he wants to keep.
     
  16. Jun 18, 2013 #16

    WindowsonWashington

    WindowsonWashington

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    That is why I recommended cutting the stucco from the frame first with an angle grinder and masonry blade.

    At that point, the door can vibrate all it wants and it won't disturb the stucco.
     
  17. Jul 3, 2013 #17

    o2284200

    o2284200

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    Thanks!
    How do I cut the stucco from the frame first with an angle grinder and masonry blade as you are recommending and not disturb the stucco?

    And what size & type of angle grinder are you recommending?
     
  18. Jul 7, 2013 #18

    WindowsonWashington

    WindowsonWashington

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    Small angle grinder with a masonry blade.

    Cut a small kirf cut between the old frame and the stucco.

    Plan on making a bunch of dust.
     
  19. Jul 12, 2013 #19

    o2284200

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    Thanks!
    I had another installer come by and he says "the way his company would install it, (move the frame out to the stucco) the problem is that the stucco guy put too much stucco on each side, which basically buried the entire brick molding."

    However, if I had told him not to stucco around the door or he had put on less stucco like he did on the top, I'd be in better shape. Now, he says I need to "chip out about an inch of stucco on each side.". Another lesson learned...Hopefully not too costly a one.

    Anyone have any thoughts?

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  20. Jul 13, 2013 #20

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    If you move the frame out to the stucco you will not have anything to screw the Security screws into
    You can leave the brick mold there. Just remove all the nails holding the frame in place, don't do anything with the brick mold and with the door still in place and the frame loose, give the door a few wacks with a heavy hammer from the outside and the frame will pull away from the brick mold. The brick mold is never glued to the frame and the two ussually seperate reasonably easy.
     

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