Replacing saddle valves

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum' started by Billbill84, Oct 3, 2019.

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  1. Oct 3, 2019 #1

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

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    IMG_0282.PNG i hate these things with a passion. Seized up! What kind of valve should I put in instead because it's gotta be something that doesn't leak like them twisty knobs! I'm thinking a small simple ball valve but my concern is that will it let too much flow to the fridge and bust a supply line on the fridge? I know them saddle valves are a simple tap with little water coming thru so I'm worried that the ball valve may be too much?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 4, 2019
  2. Oct 4, 2019 #2

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    NeilG and Billbill84 like this.
  3. Oct 4, 2019 #3

    billshack

    billshack

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    Saddle valves are illegal, they are not permitted in the canadian plumbing code.
     
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  4. Oct 4, 2019 #4

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

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    Yes they are illegal in my region as well but just another thing my home inspector missed amongst many other issues, less than a year ago!
     
  5. Oct 4, 2019 #5

    slownsteady

    slownsteady

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    If you're really concerned about pressure, install a reducer just after the new valve.
     
  6. Oct 4, 2019 #6

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    The appliances fed by those 1/4" lines are designed to handle household water pressure.
     
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  7. Oct 4, 2019 #7

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

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    Copy that designed to handle household water pressures through that 1/4 line I'll just have to make sure my plumber guy puts a reducer before the line to ensure there's not too much flow for them cheap plastic connectors that connect the 1/4 line to a 5/16 line. Had one leak the other day and all I did was turn the saddle valve off and drain the fridge water to ensure nothing leaked when I replaced the water filter lol. Who would have thought the plastic connector would fail and why?
     
  8. Oct 4, 2019 #8

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    If it's a threaded fitting it was likely overtightened.

    There is a learning curve.
     
  9. Oct 4, 2019 #9

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

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    Nope it was one of them little push-in connectors
     
  10. Oct 4, 2019 #10

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    Usually occurs while joining dissimilar products not sufficiently supported away from, or on each side of the connection point.
     
  11. Oct 4, 2019 #11

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

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    Not sure what you mean by that, the fridge is 10 years old that connector was the original. No "dissimilar products" were married lol
     
  12. Oct 4, 2019 #12

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    Refers will often use vinyl tubing, and there is copper from your saddle valve.
     
  13. Oct 4, 2019 #13

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

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    Yes but isn't that the way it goes on all setups? Supply is 1/4 copper and all refers have plastic or vinyl tubing on the appliance itself. I've never seen a fridge with copper lines affixed to it other than the supply which obviously is not a part of the fridge
     
  14. Oct 4, 2019 #14

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    I use both vinyl and copper, however I've never had a connector of any kind fail, because I always support both 3' above the connection point and have an additional 5' loop, which allows the appliance to be extracted and replaced, while the connections stay securely in place.
     
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  15. Oct 8, 2019 #15

    billshack

    billshack

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    when i worked as a plumber for a very good old firm, we would never use plastic tubing of any type, we saw too many pipe rupture . only copper pipe with flared fittings. yes we were expensive but i never saw a leak on one of our jobs.
     
  16. Oct 8, 2019 #16

    bud16415

    bud16415

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    I would cut the copper and put in a Sharkbite T fitting at each location and come off the T with PEX to behind the fridge then mount a quarter turn Sharkbite valve made to accept the tubing from the fridge with likely a brass ferule leaving all the extra tube coiled up behind the fridge for pull out and clean.


    The only tools needed will be a tubing cutter.


    The size of the plumbing has no effect on pressure in the static sense of hydraulics. There should be no fear of running a .5” to behind the fridge.
     
  17. Oct 8, 2019 #17

    bud16415

    bud16415

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    Keep in mind the type of copper tubing needed to make flare fittings is the coiled stuff that is fully annealed. The stuff you normally see with soldered fittings is a harder copper and won’t flare well.
     

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