Quantcast

Resources to DIY an exterior window?

Help Support House Repair Talk:

Flyover

Trying not to screw things up worse
Joined
Jan 6, 2017
Messages
509
Reaction score
328
Location
Oh Hah
Successfully venting the bathroom exhaust through my roof has given me the courage to cut other, larger holes in the outside surfaces of my house. I've been talking about putting a window in my bathroom forever but since I lost my job a month ago and don't currently have any strong leads this might be the time.

What I'd like to do is buy a glass block window like [this one] and then install it. But while there are plenty of videos on how to DIY a window replacement, there are very few on how to install a window where there previously wasn't one. Anybody know of good learning resources for this?

Or, if you really know your stuff, would you care to make a step-by-step how-to guide for me?

My house is a beam-on-pier ranch, so the bathroom window will be about 6-7 feet "above grade" from the outside and about 4 feet from the floor on the inside, give or take a couple feet. There's no electrical or other stuff running through the wall at that point either as far as I can gather. (And no HOA, in case that's relevant.)

Also, does anybody know if this is the kind of thing I might need to get a permit for?
 

Snoonyb

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2006
Messages
4,099
Reaction score
805
So, how about an interior and exterior photo?

When you open the exterior of a dwelling, and because in doing so, you disrupt the weather resistance of that wall, you'll need a permit, in most jurisdictions, so call or visit, and in asking, your address should not be required.
 

Flyover

Trying not to screw things up worse
Joined
Jan 6, 2017
Messages
509
Reaction score
328
Location
Oh Hah
@Snoonyb: I'll try and snap some pics later. Just curious, what do you think a photo would tell you that my description hasn't? (Oh, forgot to add: it's vinyl siding, and the house is about 40 years old.)
 

Snoonyb

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2006
Messages
4,099
Reaction score
805
Well lets see; the exterior finish material, for one, you see, you want to cut a hole in the exterior wall of the building, so I, and others, would like to have some general Idea of what we are advising you, too deal with.
 

joecaption

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2011
Messages
2,452
Reaction score
432
What's the reasoning for adding a window?
If it's for natural light a Solar Tube may be a cheaper, much easier way to go.
I've been in rooms that had no windows that had solar tubes instead, and I kept hitting the light switch to shut it off when leaving the room thinking the light was on.
If you do go with a window, I'd suggest buying a new construction window with built in J molding.
Since your a first time DIY on this one, it may be safer to do the framing for the opening from the inside before removing the siding.
That way your not left with a wall open while trying to figure out the next step.
In my opinion it's easier and comes out better to cut out the sheet rock from floor to ceiling out to the next studs beyond the window opening.
That way there's plenty of room for the new framing, and there will not be any seams on the sides of the window to crack.

Once the framings done, all the siding in that area needs to come off, I'd drill a 3/4" hole with a paddle bit in each corner of the opening and use the R/O as a template to cut out the opening with a saws all holding it at a slight angle to make sure there's no wood sticking out into the opening.
The house wrap needs to be cut at the top and lifted up so when the window is installed it can form a flap over the top flange.
Apply caulking all around the window opening, set the window in place, slightly lift it and install one roofing nail in the top middle hole making sure not to nail it tight yet.
Check the window for level then install the rest of the nails.
Now install 6" wide window tape starting at the bottom, the sides then the top, making sure to flip the house wrap flap down first.
Now it's time to reinstall the siding.
When cutting make sure to leave about a 3/8 gap so the siding has room to expand and contract.
To make sure the sidings going to all line up at the top on the last piece installed it's best to install the nails into the old holes in the middle and two ends, then add more new nails.
Never ever nail the nails tight to the wall !
The siding has to be able to expand and contract.
Under the window your going to need to add a strip of under sill, also called utility trim to keep the cut piece of siding from wrinkling.
For a small job like this you could get away with a speed square to mark it and pair of snips to cut it.
At the top of the window where you have to cut out a section, I take that cut off piece and set it inside the J mold before installing the siding.
What that does is push the siding out, up against the back side of the J molding.
 
Last edited:

Flyover

Trying not to screw things up worse
Joined
Jan 6, 2017
Messages
509
Reaction score
328
Location
Oh Hah
Well lets see; the exterior finish material, for one, you see, you want to cut a hole in the exterior wall of the building, so I, and others, would like to have some general Idea of what we are advising you, too deal with.
Like I said, it's vinyl siding.
 

Snoonyb

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2006
Messages
4,099
Reaction score
805
And I responded to post #3, before you added that.

However, I've installed siding, both horizontally, as well as vertically.

Call the building dept. and ask.
 
Top