Scoring drywall to make granite countertops fit?

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by jrolo, Sep 20, 2013.

  1. Sep 20, 2013 #1

    jrolo

    jrolo

    jrolo

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    Hello,
    Need some advice on having my granite countertops installed. The contracter put the countertops in a few days ago and it was immediately apparent that one piece had larger overhangs than the other piece (i.e. it sticks out further from the wall so the kitchen looks lopsided).

    To fix this he has proposed scoring the wall and pushing the larger piece of granite back into the wall to make it even with the other piece. Alternatively they could trim the larger piece of stone.

    Any advice on this? I'm hesitant to have him score the walls, that seems like kind of a cop-out on his part.
     
  2. Sep 20, 2013 #2

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

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    How much out are they? Your drywall is only 1/2 thick.

    Did they build a template to cut the stone?
     
  3. Sep 20, 2013 #3

    jrolo

    jrolo

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    They're off by about a third of an inch, so I was thinking along the same lines. Should they really be cutting into the wall by that much?

    There were two main pieces on the job, one to the right of my stove (which is where my sink is) and a much smaller piece to the left side of the stove. The contractors made a template for the right side but not the left.
     
  4. Sep 20, 2013 #4

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    If you are going to add a backsplash later. leave the gap to line them up, ask for a discount.
     
  5. Sep 20, 2013 #5

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

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    Well it sounds like he should have made a template for the small side or at least took a measurement. I can see how 1/3 of an inch could produce a visual problem. The question is will cutting into the drywall fix the problem and be covered up enough as to not be seen. I’m assuming there is some back splash going up and the counter below so you will never see that the stone is let into the wall a little. If I was doing it for myself I would probably sink it in the wall and forget it.

    I know when you are paying someone a lot of money you hate to see them not do it perfect also. Maybe he will work with you a little on cost or the rest of the job someplace if you let him slide on this. It’s really a judgment call on your part and then the wait for them to send the stone back to be recut.
     
  6. Sep 20, 2013 #6

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

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    Neil makes a good point. Can they bring the other side out 1/3 of an inch and let the back splash cover the gap.
     
  7. Sep 20, 2013 #7

    jrolo

    jrolo

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    Thanks for the feedback everyone.

    There will be a backsplash going up (I'm doing that myself later on) so that should cover things if they cut in to the wall. There is a small exposed space on the side of the counter between the counter and the wall, that won't be covered by the backsplash. Its out of the way, but still I can't imagine that they would be able to cut into the wall cleanly enough so that you wouldn't be able to tell in that spot.

    As far as pulling the other side out, there's really no gap at the wall now, so I think they'd have some room to move it. The problem is that its one big 'L' shaped piece, so I don't think they can pull it out without skewing the way the whole thing sits on the countertop.
     
  8. Sep 22, 2013 #8

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

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    Cutting the granite is no big deal. More accurate and more efficient to cut the counter top with an angle grinder and a diamond blade. This is a no brainer ... especially if you are adding a backsplash which will cover any irregularities in the cut.

    Invite Neal and me to dinner when it is done ... :D
     
    nealtw likes this.

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