Shower pan installation

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by Betsy, Sep 3, 2006.

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  1. Sep 3, 2006 #1

    Betsy

    Betsy

    Betsy

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    I installed a new shower pan, but I discovered that I made a mistake by first putting up the dura rock board on the walls and then placing the shower liner and cement flooring I then cut off the excess shower liner along the cement floor. What can I do to fix the mistake I've made, now that the excess liner has already been cut off?
     
  2. Nov 11, 2007 #2

    Jimbob

    Jimbob

    Jimbob

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    Do you have a picture of this as I am a little unsure of what you mean?

    Thanks
    JB
     
  3. Nov 11, 2007 #3

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

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    Hello Betsy:
    This will be a hard pill to swallow and is not a personal attack; I just want to help you to get a job you can live with.
    Its time to get a new shower pan, take down the Dura-Rock walls and the cement board floor. All that 'excess' you trimmed off is called flashing and is needed to obtain a leakproff shower; especially if it is on the second floor. Yes, it can be jimmied and jerry rigged to make it work as is, but for how long?
    The shower pan goes in first, then the walls and floor are built to it. That way all the water that runs down is channeled to the inside of the shower pan.
    Sorry it didn't work out for you and I wish you success on the next try.
    Glenn
     
  4. Nov 11, 2007 #4

    travelover

    travelover

    travelover

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    Glenn is right. Even a small leak can do endless damage over the years. Shower pans need to be absolutely and robustly leak free.

    On the bright side, better to ask now rather than wait until the tile is set and grouted.
     
  5. Nov 12, 2007 #5

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

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    Hello Betsy:
    When I was teaching Plumbing, I had several mock-ups of bathrooms, kitchens, etc. which I would assign to a crew and tell them what fixtures I wanted used on it.
    Invariably, they would make a mistake here and there. Some I would let go until they found out for themselves it wouldn't work; others I would have them to change on the spot, depending on the 'teachable' moment.
    I never ridiculed them for mistakes; I just told them "its much better to make a mistake here than in a customer's home. Here it is just between us and will be a lesson well learned and when you go into a customer's home you won't make it again".
    When we do work for ourselves it may not go just right the first time but we can change our own work and just not mention it to anyone. It costs a little more but its still less costly than having a professional to do the whole thing. If they make a mistake, they tear it out wrecklesly, we can salvage most of our materials and start again.
    Let's just mark this one up to hard earned experience and not mention it to anyone, OK?
    Glenn
     

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