Shut off valve replacement?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum' started by Webster, Jun 11, 2009.

  1. Jun 11, 2009 #1

    Webster

    Webster

    Webster

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    How hard is it to repair a copper pipe soldered on shut off valve? Is it worth trying to repair? If I unsolder the shut off valve, should I try and resolder on a new valve or uses a compression valve? If you need to repalce a compression shut off vave, can you just unscrew the old one and replace, or do you have to cut the pipe again? I do not have enough extra pipe to cut. Thanks
     
  2. Jun 11, 2009 #2

    Redwood

    Redwood

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    Webster, It is not hard but from the sounds of things you may want to get someone with some experience in sweating pipe to show you the ropes...
     
  3. Jun 11, 2009 #3

    Nestor_Kelebay

    Nestor_Kelebay

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    Webster:

    You would do well to buy yourself a quality propane torch and some copper fittings and learn to solder. Soldering is something that almost every DIY'er eventually learns, and it's an important skill to acquire because soldered joints are (in my opinion) the most reliable joints you can make.

    People who don't solder often will turn to compression fittings as an alternative. I would never trust anything but a soldered joint if the piping is going to be covered with drywall or inaccessible for some other reason.
     
  4. Jun 11, 2009 #4

    Redwood

    Redwood

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    Nestor, I agree with you completely on compression joints.
    In fact I don't know of any code in the US that allows them in concealed locations.

    I agree sweating is easy you just may want to find someone that knows how to show you the ropes the first time. After that it's all practice.
     

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