Single handle faucet knob with apparently no index button to pry off?

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MissLaurus

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Q. I need to replace an old (1980’s) American Standard Model #1495 single handle shower faucet control (with a single acrylic knob), but can't figure out how to remove it. The knob doesn’t have an index button (which normally you would pry out in order to access the screw behind it), but in this case the acrylic knob is one molded piece--no separate index button to pry off. The knob doesn’t twist off either. Has anyone dealt with this type before? Faucet Knob.jpgFaucet Controller.jpg
 

oldognewtrick

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The face pops off and should revel a Phillips screw. Look for a seam near the front edge.
 

MissLaurus

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Thank you. It appears somebody must have glued the index button into the knob--the button is in there so tight, there doesn't appear to be any seam at all. Assuming this is what has happened, can you kindly recommend a product to dissolve/loosen the glue (whatever type of glue a misguided plumber is likely to have used to glue the button in? Thank you so much.
 

joecaption

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I'd use a utility knife to cut around the seam.
Those buttons very often break and any Hardware store, HD, or Lowes will sell replacements.
 

gfw

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I had some Delta handles that look like that. As has been said, the whole face pops off. Mine at least had a spot between two of the ridges of the handle where there was a little hole, a gap between the faceplate and the rest of the handle. So one could get a very small screwdriver in there and pry the face up.

Are you sure they were glued? It could just be really stuck from age. There would likely be some yellowed overflow if they used an epoxy.
 

gfw

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The diagram on this page indicates that olddognewtrick is right.

Heh, I see you got the same answer at Houzz

Another diagram showing basically the same thing
 
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BuzzLOL

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If you have a large pair of tin snips you may be able to 'cut' into the joint and pop the cap off...
 
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