Single-stud dilemma

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Psanoja

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Hello everyone,
I’ve demolished three arches in my house. Two of them were created by a house remodel in the 1970s. They were small arches in a hallway.
For context, my home was built in 1900 as a 1 story cottage. Someone built a 2/3 second story, with a 45° angle roof, which starts tapering halfway through the width of the house. To support it, they installed a new beam in the basement underpinned by three steel rods. The wall where the two small arches were built ran parallel, almost on top of the beam.
When I opened up the drywall, I could see that there’s a single stud in between the space where the arches used to be. I’m considering axing it, but wonder why it wasn’t done during that remodeling. Can a single 2x4 support that much weight? Will I damage the house? I’m attaching pictures. Thank you for whatever input you may give.
 

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Snoonyb

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They space between, THE TWO STUDS, describes a raceway to facilitate the placement of elec., and without the header above the arches being exposed, there can be only speculation, as to the. load bearing of the framing.
 

Snoonyb

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Nope, not helpful, photo's need to be panoramic so there is perspective.
 

Psanoja

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Here’s a picture of the whole wall section. They left a single stud in the middle. That wall runs all the way to the exterior wall, so there are several studs before and right after this arch. This arch ends in the wall that is perpendicular to the beam—about two feet to the right of what is shown here.
 

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Snoonyb

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Thank you.
Now, for some further context. What is directly above the double top plate that the stud is attached too?
 

Psanoja

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There’s an empty space in the second floor. A hallway leading to the upstairs rooms.
 

Snoonyb

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Thanks.
Are either of the walls that define the hallway, directly above the double top plate?
 

Psanoja

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No, there’s an open space in front of the two rooms to which their doors open to. When I’m done remodeling, I’ll put carpet, two bean bags or a couch, and a tv for the kids to play with their Xbox. No structure is on top of that wall.
 

Snoonyb

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Thanks, just one more thing.
Using a stud finder, on both sides of the double top plate, run it along the ceiling, parallel with the double top plates. Any patterned framing members crossing, or resting on the double top plates will be revealed, and will indicate that the wall has been loaded.

Or you may just encounter a couple of indications, which would probably be span blocking.
 

Psanoja

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Thank you for this advice. I was thinking that I don’t need the opening to be that long, and need wall space to place furniture, and in that little hallway behind the former arches, I’d like to build shelves. The house doesn’t have too many closets. So, what if I add two or three studs on the right side of the opening, before I ax the stud in the middle? That will restore some evenness of strength to that wall, while I get the access and look that I need.
 

Snoonyb

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@ things; Have you decided the relocation for the elec., and it will be necessary to secure the double top plate that remains, by opening the ceiling to add a block/backing for repairing the ceiling material, where the new framing ends, unless you intend to finish the double top plate, in place.
 

Psanoja

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@ things; Have you decided the relocation for the elec., and it will be necessary to secure the double top plate that remains, by opening the ceiling to add a block/backing for repairing the ceiling material, where the new framing ends, unless you intend to finish the double top plate, in place.
I thought about it and it will be better to leave it as is. Will create a frame to attach the drywall and add a wooden frame to each opening.
 

Psanoja

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Thank you for the input. I'm a beginner, aspiring carpenter. I love working with wood, but I'm not very fluent yet with building conventions.
 

Psanoja

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So, I ended up getting rid of the stud. I added two studs to the right and the edge of the frame stands under the double plate. I had to extend the wire (had to call an electrician because it was aluminum wire) and installed a light switch on the outer side of the new wall. I noticed that underneath every wall’s frame the carpenters dug the floor. See second pic. Why would they do something like that?
 

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Eddie_T

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Thank you for the input. I'm a beginner, aspiring carpenter. I love working with wood, but I'm not very fluent yet with building conventions.
I built my own house and never got used to conventions such as jack and cripple studs.
 

Psanoja

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Well, I did add a cripple stud in the header. Not that that qualifies me as a good builder…
 

Snoonyb

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"I noticed that underneath every wall’s frame the carpenters dug the floor. See second pic. Why would they do something like that?"

It may have something to do with the floor material.
 

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