Snapped concrete pier on attached covered porch

Discussion in 'Decks & Patios' started by lookingforanswers, Jun 4, 2016.

  1. Jun 4, 2016 #1

    lookingforanswers

    lookingforanswers

    lookingforanswers

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    One of the concrete piers on my side porch has snapped.

    How do I get a new pier in place in order to repair.

    I live in Southern New Brunswick, Canada. I'm guessing it was originally placed at a 4' depth to counter frost heave.

    The snap is about 8" down from the top of the pier.

    Advice appreciated.

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    Last edited: Jun 4, 2016
  2. Jun 6, 2016 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Block up the beam and start digging.
    There should be footing at the four ft mark which may or may not be there, there should be rebar in the concrete to help it stay together.
    What a lot of people do is dig the hole and stand a sono tube in it and fill it with concrete with no footing and backfill with dirt.
    Then there is no virgin dirt to hold it in place, or a good frost just pushed it side ways .
    You won't know the fix for sure until you dig down and around it, You should be able to save the pier and add a footing or anchor it to a footing that might be there .
    I would dig down on the out side and work my way under in line with the beam.
     
  3. Jun 6, 2016 #3

    lookingforanswers

    lookingforanswers

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    Thanks for the response nealtw.

    I already dug it out last fall - the snapped portion isn't visible because the area filled in with a few inches of mud in the spring.

    The only thing holding the upper section of pier (above the snap) in place is the rebar which is bent at the angle visible in the photo.

    The section of pier below the snap is perfectly vertical.

    I'm thinking I'll follow your idea about blocking it up and digging my way inwards from the end of the beam.

    How far down do I have to dig if I anchor the two piers together? In other words can I just dig down two feet and bolt a new short pier to the good section or would I have to go down the full four feet?

    It's a clay like soil surrounding the pier - it tends to rise considerably during the winter.

    Thanks again.
     
  4. Jun 6, 2016 #4

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    If you were to bolt something to the side of the old one you will provide something for the frost to lift so you want to dig down to footing depth and see what you have.
     
  5. Jun 6, 2016 #5

    lookingforanswers

    lookingforanswers

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    I've got some shoveling to do.

    The basic idea is to displace as little soil as possible while excavating the original pier working from the direction of the end of the beam.

    How will I anchor the new pier to the footing - if their is one?

    I'll post a new photo of what I'm dealing with after I get the pier dug out. I'm assuming this would have to be done by myself or by hiring a contractor anyway. I prefer handling the labor side of the job myself and let a pro do the installation anyway.

    Thank you again for the insight.
     
  6. Jun 6, 2016 #6

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Let's see what you have first, this will all be diy.
     

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