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swimmer_spe

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I am moving to a house on a lake. We have a dog. We get winter. My plan is to put snow fencing along the lake to keep our dog from running down the lake when it freezes. The challenge I have is that I would still like to access the lake in winter. How d I make a gate with snow fencing that will keep a dog in, but can allow us to walk out?
 

Snoonyb

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There are multiple types of material folks use for "snow fencing," what type are you using?
 

swimmer_spe

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There are multiple types of material folks use for "snow fencing," what type are you using?
I am thinking of something cheap, like the orange stuff. It may be something that is done just this year and then something else is figured out.
 

Johnboy555

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If using the orange plastic, drive in the posts and put 2 about 2 1/2' apart where you want the gate. Attach everything with zip ties to one section. Do the other section, allowing about an extra 6" at the "gate" to overlap. Use the extra to wrap and zip tie to a big dowel, or piece of 1x2. Use a couple of bungee cords to hold gate closed and tight. :good luck:
 

Snoonyb

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Just as an example; 50' of fabric, gate in the middle, drive in a steel fence stake 23' from either end, secure fabric with wire or zip ties or twine, drive another stake 3' further and secure the fabric, cut the fabric close to either post and secure the loose end to a 2x2. Make 2 loops of wire, twins or zip ties and place 1 at the bottom and the other at the top of either fixed post, insert the 2x2 into the bottom loop and loop the top loop over the 2x2.

Ranchers and farmers have been using this type of gate for hundreds of years.
 

Snoonyb

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Actually, they are similar in concept, just different verbiage, and the point being the simplicity of an age old practice.
 

swimmer_spe

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I am understanding the concepts. My issue is that we get about 4 feet of snow. Parts o the snow fence will get buried. My concern is that it will all be buried in the snow.
 

Snoonyb

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Sounds like a shovel and a snowblower, just to get to the gate.
 

Johnboy555

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The original question was a temporary way to keep the dog from running out on the ice. Was it not? If your dog can run through 4' of snow a little plastic fence won't slow him down.
I may live in So California now, but lived 90% of my life outside of Chicago and have actually waded through 4' of snow! The only part of my car I could see was the orange Union 76 ball on the antenna. My brother lives in Michigan. His back yard is probably just like yours, 150' from the lake and 40' above water level. So I know exactly of what you speak. He has 3 dogs and hasn't lost one yet.
 

bud16415

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I wouldn’t worry about the dog if you really don’t want him down there it is better to teach him his zone. Or the easier way with invisible fence and a shock collar.

The bigger problem you may have is in what snow fence is designed to do. It is used to intentionally cause a drift where you want it and then a clear area where you don’t want it in the case of wind driven snow. There is a lot of trial and error and a little science in where you place one and I have seen people put one up only to direct a huge snow drift in their driveway or worse their neighbors.
 

Jeff Handy

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Not only will your planned fence look like flimsy hillbilly junk, it will collect windblown trash all year.
And block your views of the lake.
And block easy access for a boat or ice fishing hut or whatever.
And your dog will probably dig under or chew through immediately.

And no fence has a magical gate that can still swing when buried in four feet of snow.
Which might actually end up much higher as the snow drifts against it.

I agree with training your dog, or the pet fence system.

You can also get a manual control button to shock him if he goes out onto the frozen lake.

Or get a dog training shock collar that hunters use.
 

MrMiz

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I think the invisible fence/collar is your best bet.

Like bud16415 said. A snow fence is for forcing the snow to drift where you want it rather than where you don't. A properly planned and working snow fence is actually a pretty amazing bit of engineering, weather planning and age old wisdom, and very very few people get it right. In my area we have a lot of wind.... and if it snows even just a little the wind blows it until it hits something and then deposits it usually on the south side... that something can be a rock, 2' tall weeds or a 4' fence. If nothing has stopped the wind from blowing the snow it will deposit ALL the snow in that area on the south side of the fence until there is no snow left OR the wind fills it till its flat. Usually resulting in a drift the exact height of the "something that blocks it. So when planning a snow fence your really trying to get the wind to hit something and deposit the snow where you want it rather than, say, your garage door, driveway, etc. It's mostly old Farmers that understand this and you can tell right away who does not when you see somebody pile snow on the North side of their drive way.... there by creating a "Snow Fence" that will fill back in their driveway to the exact height of their piled snow. Resulting in them giving me a call and asking if I can dig them out with my tractor again.... I have one neighbor that refuses to listen to me and has decided since that he just needs a big 6 ft fence on the north side of his drive to stop the snow from drifting. I'm going to send him a bill if it piles up the whole 6ft ;-)

So back to the original post. If it's truly the performance of a "Snow fence" your looking for the only way to have a gate you can use would be to make one that the snow can easily pass through and not create a drift on the other side. However because snow piles on the other side of even a small blade of grass this creates a problem for preventing your dog to get through. Here we make gates out of a single or sometimes double bar swing gate about 2 feet off the ground so that the snow that hits it falls down and then is blown under and past the entry. Then for livestock we put in those "Cattle stoppers" in the ground to prevent them from crossing it. I've never owned a dog so I don't know if the cattle stopper would deter a dog(probably not they're too smart), but those also fill with snow occasionally and can be a bit trouble some without the bar gate I mentioned. Cattle do usually remember where they are even if they covered but young ones forget and have trouble. You might be able to get away with a gate that is made out of wire, but make sure it's fairly large and the higher off the ground the better. Make sure you keep it clear of any weeds/growth. I've seen chicken wire occasionally cause a drift but if anything has grown on it at all it creates a snow fence.

We don't ever get 4' of snow here but every time it snows we easily get 4' drifts. If your not getting that kind of wind then I would forgo the fence all together and like others have said go with the invisible fence.
 

Johnboy555

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I am moving to a house on a lake. We have a dog. We get winter. My plan is to put snow fencing along the lake to keep our dog from running down the lake when it freezes. The challenge I have is that I would still like to access the lake in winter. How d I make a gate with snow fencing that will keep a dog in, but can allow us to walk out?
I think we've gotten A BIT off track here...
Obviously there won't be going to the lake in 4' of snow! The problem is keeping the dog off the lake as it's freezing (so he's not hurt by breaking thru the ice, or getting wet and dirty when the temp is freezing)
Also the electronic fence is not a good idea under the circumstances as the dog will remember where it is and won't go down to the lake even during the nice days of summer. Even if you carry him/her they will have anxiety when you get near the line. It happens, believe me.
I believe my original idea will work to solve the problem as originally stated.
The idea is for a temporary solution to a temporary problem.
 

bud16415

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I know it is off topic but this boarder fence is a bit like the southern boarder fence. Ether you do it all or don’t do it at all because people and dogs will find the end and go around.



IMO having owned dogs my whole life there are two types of dogs or there should be two types of dogs. Those you take to obedience school and work with them and they then respond to verbal commands or the type that when outside go with you on a leash.



The worst are the type that have trained their owners. We had a sale at her Granny’s farm house last weekend. A carload of people pull up and I hear a woman yell don’t let the dogs out followed by a guy laughing saying it is too late now. These two dogs were running everyplace and jumping on people and the guy says oh don’t worry they are just letting you know they love you as the dogs are heading out in the cow pasture to tell the cows they love them too. The people shopped and when it came time to leave start calling for the dogs. I tell him they are out in the pasture and I hope the bull doesn’t hurt them and no you can’t go get them because the bull will kill you. So for 30 minutes they call the dogs and tempt them with treats until the dogs were tired out and came back for food and covered in mud.

Unless you put a fence all around the property dog will be dogs and find their way to the lake if it is someplace they want to be. Put in a run ether with a fence or a cable run and they will be outside and safe. Then train them to a lead at least so they get the basic commands and don’t pull you around. Then if you really want a well trained dog train them off lead.

If you go the fence route my suggestion is chain link.
 

MrMiz

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I think we've gotten A BIT off track here...
Obviously there won't be going to the lake in 4' of snow! The problem is keeping the dog off the lake as it's freezing (so he's not hurt by breaking thru the ice, or getting wet and dirty when the temp is freezing)
Also the electronic fence is not a good idea under the circumstances as the dog will remember where it is and won't go down to the lake even during the nice days of summer. Even if you carry him/her they will have anxiety when you get near the line. It happens, believe me.
I believe my original idea will work to solve the problem as originally stated.
The idea is for a temporary solution to a temporary problem.
Ah Ok so not a snow fence you just need a fence for the dog. So just make a horse fence and keep it off the ground a few inches so you can weed wack under it so the snow doesn't drift:

edit should have just posted and image:
1601312677703.png

and as far as a gate make a rectangle with the post material and then use the wire to cover it so it can blow through too.
 

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