Solution for bowed P/T 6x6 Support Posts

Discussion in 'Framing and Foundation' started by sgklein, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. Aug 4, 2011 #1

    sgklein

    sgklein

    sgklein

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    I recently had a screened in porch added to my home (14' x 18'). A roof was added...attached to the main roof but supported by 4 P/T 6X6 posts attached by saddle brackets to poured concrete in each corner.
    The 2 posts on the one side have bowed severely by 1" to 1.5" from top to bottom (bowing towards the outside).
    I am concerned about the structural integrity since they are both bowed. Is this something to worry about, other than the fact that it looks like crap? The builder said he will be back to fix it but wasn't sure how he was going to do it yet without having to rip the whole thing apart. Any suggestions?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Aug 4, 2011 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    These posts will bend under to much weight, but it dosn't sound like you have overloaded these posts. They are crowning as they dry out, I think. If your builder changes them out for you tell him to consider using four 2x6s instead of a post. When using 2x6 you crown one to the right ,one to the left and so on and they stay straight.
     
  3. Aug 12, 2011 #3

    BridgeMan

    BridgeMan

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    Doesn't sound like overloading is the problem--a typical SPF 6 x 6 should be good for at least a compressive stress of 875 psi, meaning a total load of more than 26,000 pounds. I suspect your contractor either used green wood, or possibly the side exposed to weather is sucking in excessive moisture (causing it to swell and grow), or is expanding more than the shaded interior face when hit with direct sunlight, also causing it to lengthen and bow outward.

    Let your contractor propose how he plans to fix his problem, and then let us know here what he says, giving us a chance to give you some additional background or options.
     

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