Splicing ductwork?

Discussion in 'HVAC' started by planner101, Aug 25, 2013.

  1. Aug 25, 2013 #1

    planner101

    planner101

    planner101

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    Hi,

    I tried doing a search for my question but no results were shown, so I tried going back a few pages and couldn't see my question asked.


    The bank accepted my offer on a house I put a bid on, so the house is not in my possession... Im strictly in the planning and budgeting phase...assuming all goes as intended.

    And this is for information as well as advice... in other words I do know my best bet is to call an HVAC specialist and get their advice... but would like to go into it knowing a little bit about what they are going to talk to me about.


    So, in this house I was thinking of using the breakfast nook, which is near the hallway that connects the bedrooms, and turning it into a bedroom. I don't remember if there was a vent in that area or not, but assuming there isn't...

    Is it insane to splice the ductwork and run it into the room? I know there is something regarding cfm(?)--don't know what that means but from context clues has to do with sq. footage and what the AC can handle--but since I'm not adding sq ft, would it be possible to splice the ductwork into the "new" room and it not effect the rest of the house?

    Don't want a window unit. I'm afraid of the bill with those things.

    It is a single story house... around 1,600 sq ft.
     
  2. Aug 25, 2013 #2

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

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    Your system may or may not have capacity to accommodate that area. The CFMs in a system are sized for the size of the rooms.

    To get you started, here is a step-by-step calculator. http://www.ehow.com/how_5677999_calculate-cfm-hvac.html

    Now, you need to know what your system is generating and if you have the capacity to do the job. Calculate all the loads ... add the new load. Look at your plate and check out the comparison.

    ROOM.jpg
     
  3. Aug 26, 2013 #3

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

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    It is reasonable to think that that much air is going to that area anyway but the more you know before you call the pros the better. And welcome to the site and congrats on the new digs.
     
    planner101 likes this.

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