Splits/Crack on 6x6 PT support posts - cause of concern ?

Help Support House Repair Talk:

Anidil Rajendran

New Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2018
Messages
2
Reaction score
1
1.jpg 2.jpg 3.jpg Greetings
Hi All
I just recently moved to my new home and everything is cool until I noticed the huge cracks on the column that supports on the horizontal beam. This is on patio. Pictures attached.
Home inspection did not notice it when he did the inspection, nor did I. The inspection person now says it is a natural phenomenon and nothing to worry about. Looking at the length of the cracks and the weight the column is supporting, I am unable to buy it.
The old owner says, it never bothered him and it is not something he did. I am assuming the cracks existed even before he moved in and deteriorated over a period of time.
At this point what can I do to fix it?
Is this a cause of concern ? is there a possibility the structure above can collapse if neglected?

Any advice will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Snoonyb

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2006
Messages
3,875
Reaction score
741
You see that as fairly common when the member is unfinished and it would be of a greater concern if you could see through the member.

Do you have a photo of the other side, or the other 3 sides?
 

joecaption

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2011
Messages
2,374
Reaction score
406
It's called checking, caused by uneven drying, and it's normal and should not effect the strength.
 

nealtw

Contractor retired
Joined
Nov 4, 2010
Messages
24,769
Reaction score
3,395
Location
Chiliwack BC Canada
That is not a problem, if you don't like the look dress it with something that looks nice.
 

CallMeVilla

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2010
Messages
1,657
Reaction score
597
You can "wrap" the posts with 1'x6' wood to conceal the checking. It will look a lot better! Safety is no concern.
 

Attachments

joecaption

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2011
Messages
2,374
Reaction score
406
A 6 X 6 post can not be wrapped with 1 X 6's for several reasons.
#1, They would not be wide enough, they would have to be made out of 1 X 8's that can be ripped down if needed.
#2, I've never seen a perfectly straight pressure treated anything, so the box will need to be made bigger to account for that.
I like to use vinyl post wraps so there's no more painting and no chance the bottom will rot out.
 

bud16415

Fixer Upper
Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Feb 5, 2013
Messages
5,581
Reaction score
1,978
Location
Erie, PA
Put some bondo in the cracks sand the posts lightly and stain them to match the house trim.
 

joecaption

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2011
Messages
2,374
Reaction score
406
Sorry but any form of filler will crack over time and act as a wedge as the wood shrink / swells over the seasons and will not take stain, unless you use solid stain.
 

bud16415

Fixer Upper
Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Feb 5, 2013
Messages
5,581
Reaction score
1,978
Location
Erie, PA
Put some pliable / painters caulking in the gaps and paint with solid paint that will match the house trim.
 

CallMeVilla

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2010
Messages
1,657
Reaction score
597
[QUOTE="A 6 X 6 post can not be wrapped with 1 X 6's for several reasons.
#1, They would not be wide enough, they would have to be made out of 1 X 8's that can be ripped down if needed.
#2, I've never seen a perfectly straight pressure treated anything, so the box will need to be made bigger to account for that.
I like to use vinyl post wraps so there's no more painting and no chance the bottom will rot out.[/QUOTE]

Yeah, my bad for tossing off a quick reply. 1"x6" is too small. Ripping a 1"x8" would do the job.
 

driz

Active Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2017
Messages
33
Reaction score
3
Couldn’t you strengthen and stabilize this better by sinking a few big lag screws across the crack area. Come in from the back or side where the head stays hidden.
 

driz

Active Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2017
Messages
33
Reaction score
3
Nope but they are cheap easy and will lock it in place from splitting any wider. I’d wrap that pillar in vinyl after and call it a day.
I just cleaned up some rather fugly gappy facia on my barn using wide vinyl leftovers in 12’ lengths. Disgustingly easy to work with that stuff and it looks good .
 

Eddie_T

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2015
Messages
93
Reaction score
12
Rather than start a new thread I'll just ask my question here. What do you recommend for repair of 6x6 deck posts that have checked and decayed even though chamfered?
 

Eddie_T

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2015
Messages
93
Reaction score
12
Post some photos?
No photos, the deck is not at my location but the heartwood on several post tops has decayed to a depth of 1-2" with a diameter of ≈ 1.5". My thought is that decayed wood will have to be drilled out ,stabilized and filled. Afterwards maybe make a die to form aluminum post caps from flashing, too many (30-40, not all damaged) to purchase protective caps at $10 min ea. An alternate might be some product to totally seal the chamfered tops so they will repel water. AS you can tell from my musings I have no experience at this.

There isn't enough exposure to do it or I would suggest sawing off the damaged tops and doweling on new tops. It might be possible to saw off just the chamfer and replace with a decorative wood top without vertical grain. But for openers the decay must be stopped.
 
Last edited:

David Newell

Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2018
Messages
12
Reaction score
3
Location
Sacramento Area
How to Repair Rotted Wood
Rebuild and restore rotted wood without replacing it
https://www.familyhandyman.com/doors/how-to-repair-rotted-wood/view-all/
I've used a similar technique with more expensive components to rebuild a rotting boat transom,
with "better-than-I-thought-it would-turn- out" results.

Also, gal steel framing members are cheap, and can be used to easily make wood post caps,
or laid atop wood which will be exposed to dry -rot generating water and sun cycles.
When painted, it is unnoticeable.
 

Eddie_T

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2015
Messages
93
Reaction score
12
Rebuild and restore rotted wood without replacing it
https://www.familyhandyman.com/doors/how-to-repair-rotted-wood/view-all/
I've used a similar technique with more expensive components to rebuild a rotting boat transom,
with "better-than-I-thought-it would-turn- out" results.

Also, gal steel framing members are cheap, and can be used to easily make wood post caps,
or laid atop wood which will be exposed to dry -rot generating water and sun cycles.
When painted, it is unnoticeable.
Sounds like the way to go, wood hardener should take care of any doty wood the clean out misses. Post caps are proving to be a problem as there are several posts to be protected and the current chamfers are not as shallow as available caps which are also a bit pricey. I think the solution will have to be diy. The owner is a welder so he may be able to anneal and form some sort of cap that fits. I think there are only 3 or 4 posts needing repair.
 
2

Latest posts

Top