Steam Generator Pressure Release Valve

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum' started by runlikegump, Feb 13, 2007.

  1. Feb 13, 2007 #1

    runlikegump

    runlikegump

    runlikegump

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    I am in the process of installing a steam generator for my steam shower. Currently the pressure release valve is going back into the shower on a seperate line then the regular steam. It was recently brought to my attention that this set up is hazardous and should be changed. Does anyone know the force of the water that will be expelled from the pressure release pipe and can this installation stand as is? What is the ideal placement for this pipe and does it need to be deposited outside the home?

    Thanks,

    Glenn
     
  2. Feb 14, 2007 #2

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

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    Steam only needs a half pound of pressure to be dangerous.
    Steam is always best left to a professional because it has the tendency to destroy things when they go bad.

    I have water heater videos from the 30's of these copper tanks going through a building up to 600 feet away...cool if your not in the building.:)
     
  3. Feb 15, 2007 #3

    elementx440

    elementx440

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    i suppose you can expect it NOT to be ejecting steam at a regular basis, so why not just direct it to the floor like on a hot water tank? i'd avoid aiming it at the naked bodies of showerers if i were you
     
  4. Feb 15, 2007 #4

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

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    Welcome to the Forum, Glenn:
    I don't know if the folks here can stand 2 Glenn's, but we will have to give it a try.
    Your steam pressure releif valve should come directly off the steam generator within 3" of the generator, extend outside with a fall for drainage, and to within 4" of the ground. Steam can build a tremedous amount of pressure and, if it exceeds the municipal water pressure, it will back up in the service pipe unless there is a backflow preventer. Many municipalities require a backflow preventer at the meter, so that any pressure or contamination on your side can't affect the whole neighborhood.
    Having the releif line run to the ground will prevent anyone from getting scalded if it does pop off. Keep in mind; when water changes to steam it expands to 17 times its original size. You can see how that would cause a lot of pressure.
    Glenn (the Kentucky one)
     

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