Structural support for Sill Plate replacement (on slab)

Discussion in 'Framing and Foundation' started by Raman Sridharan, Sep 3, 2019.

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  1. Sep 3, 2019 #1

    Raman Sridharan

    Raman Sridharan

    Raman Sridharan

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    Hi,
    Ive noticed that the sill plate on my 2 story house has some water damage. I want to replace it and am looking at what the best way to support the load is. The ceiling is 14+ft tall in this area, so cant build a frame to support the ceiling directly.

    Basically the structure looks like this visualization:
    photo1.png

    Looking to do something like this, for each of the horizontal 2x4s that make up the sill plate; and replace them one at a time. Using a 2x8 nailed to the vertical 2x4s, and wedge multiple 2x4s under the horizontal 2x8 to support the load:
    photo2.png

    I would probably nail the 2x8 at least 3-4ft high; so the angled load support 2x4s dont sit at too high an angle.

    Or, a slightly different better idea using 4x4s and jacks (using 4 screws to join the 4x4s to each other). I worry that the off center force applied by the jacks will increase the stress on the screws joining the large 4x4 to the 2x4s though.

    photo3.png

    Any thoughts or suggestions about this?

    Thanks
     

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    Last edited: Sep 3, 2019
  2. Sep 3, 2019 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    For the wall that is holding up the ceiling you need a temp wall
     
  3. Sep 3, 2019 #3

    Raman Sridharan

    Raman Sridharan

    Raman Sridharan

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    Well, my ceiling is 14+ feet high and sloped in one area; it will be tough but possible to put up a temp wall.
    In another area though, the cieling is only 10ft tall but there is a second story above it; What method for support should be used in this case?
     
  4. Sep 3, 2019 #4

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    lifting the weight straight up is the best you don't want to take a chance of the wall kicking out, have you opened the wall yet to see what all you have to deal with, plans might change when you get there. I would be afraid of the bottom of the sheeting behind the stucco.
     
  5. Sep 3, 2019 #5

    Raman Sridharan

    Raman Sridharan

    Raman Sridharan

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    I have not yet removed all the drywall yet. This was actually originally a floor replacement, and has turned into a huge thing...

    You mean worry about the load support pushing on the sheeting and fracturing it?

    I am thinking of nailing some 4x4s (or 2x8s) to the side of the 2x4 beams and supporting those 4x4s with jacks or other 2x4s; I can see how the latter could push on the plywood sheeting.

    What I worry about is the screws holding the 4x4s giving out. I guess I need to do some calculations to make sure that this wont happen, or to decide how many screws to use.
     
  6. Sep 3, 2019 #6

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    rot mold and termite damage for a foot or two up the sheeting and studs,.

    I saw your plan before, I would give that a better chance of loosing the wall outwards and the roof going with it. This is not the place to re invent wheels. If you don't like my plan wait for others that have experience to add their opinions.
     
  7. Sep 3, 2019 #7

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    If the ceiling slops to the wall you are working on the temp wall won't work.

    If there are 2nd floor, floor joist or ceiling joist that DO NOT land on this wall the temp wall will not work.

    I would lag bolt a 2x8 on each side of the wall and support the wall from both sides with jacks.
     
  8. Sep 3, 2019 #8

    Raman Sridharan

    Raman Sridharan

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    Thanks, thats what I am leaning towards. I guess I will have to tear down the stucco to get this done, no way around it without risking a big moment breaking the frame.
     
  9. Sep 3, 2019 #9

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    Actually, just remove a ft. or so of drywall, which then locates the studs, then with a masonry drill, drill thru and that's your locator for the exterior prop.

    You'll need to break away above the screed to locate those and the lathing nails/staples.

    Remember, you'll only need 1/8 to 1/4" lift.
     
  10. Sep 4, 2019 #10

    Raman Sridharan

    Raman Sridharan

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    That sounds much easier than what I had planned!

    Let me back up a little but though. The water damaged wood is discolored/dark; and when I dig a screwdriver into it the screwdriver only goes in about 1/8 of an inch; the wood is not crisp like good wood is though. Does this sound like it even needs to be replaced?

    Still seems like it can hold the structural load no problem; but worried about further rot/damage. The original water problem has been fixed.
     
  11. Sep 4, 2019 #11

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    I wouldn't go thru the trouble, which eleviates you from having to pull permits and disclose at an eventual sale.
     
  12. Sep 4, 2019 #12

    Raman Sridharan

    Raman Sridharan

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    Would you recommend an epoxy sealer to prevent further rot? Or is that not worth the effort?
     
  13. Sep 4, 2019 #13

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    If you have removed the source of the moisture intrusion, I wouldn't bother, you're in a reasonably dry climate zone.
     

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