Suggestions for make this "fine" woodwork a little cleaner?

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rokosz

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I'm installing shutters. When I got into it I realized the windows needed overall attention attention (painted shut upper sash, no weather stripping, 6 coats of paint on everything. So, made it a whole rehab, strip the paint from every surface, replace the cords with brass chain, weather strip etc.

I see lots of air between surface meets. Any suggestions for remedying the current state and avoiding it when I get to that step on the other two windows?

More information&pix (aka my ramble):

Now I'm working on the 2nd window and I see how things could be better. Namely the filler board and stops installation. They're not snug. The stops are reused, so I get that their edges aren't necessarily the sharpest.

My main desire is to not have the gaps show. So caulk or screw? In the closeup pic of the filler and the jamb stop I see the meet isn't well mitred either. That will have to improve on window 2 & 3. It may look truly sloppy but its actually supposed to arc with the arc of the shutter tops. (ie. the mitre is not a straightedge)

Did I install and paint backwards? I painted the "pieces" prior to installation, figuring it'd make for a neater, easier, less cursing paint job. But I ended up with the gaps. and punch holes of fresh wood from the brads.

So, Correcting/filling the gaps. Can it be down without dis-installation? If caulk is it, how do you get a needle thin feed?

For windows 2 & 3 should the top coats be done _after_ installation, cursing be, well, damxxd? That way gaps are filled before top-coating?

Are the gaps worse due to fastening? I used 18ga 1"+ brads on the stops. The shutters are screwed though the filler and I'd think that'd be enough to draw things tight, but apparently not in my effort. The surfaces were smooth and square. Fillers are 1x6 ripped select pine, the receiving side the side of the vintage trim.

Thanks for lookingIMG_1675.JPGIMG_1676.JPG
 

bud16415

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Painters caulk will fill all the little imperfections before final coat of paint.

Sometimes a full view picture of the window helps us get the big picture when we see the close up detailed photos.

Do you have outside storm windows for winter? That's how they did it back in the day.
 

rokosz

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Painters caulk will fill all the little imperfections before final coat of paint.

Sometimes a full view picture of the window helps us get the big picture when we see the close up detailed photos.

Do you have outside storm windows for winter? That's how they did it back in the day.
thanks B16145, ahh, storms -- me thinks the shutters I mention are thought to be Exterior? they are interior. Needed something and couldn't fathom spending crazy dollars on "drapes". These 3 windows are under a covered front porch. 15 years ago when the porch was restored and exterior stripped I removed the 1970s aluminum storms and had custom made storms made to match the victorian house. the sash glass, (5 of the 6 panes) is original wavy glass. Well 4 of 6 now. I broke one trying to get the upper sash loose. Luckily that same window's lower sash was replaced with modern at some point in the past. So now I'll get restoration wavy for both.
One thing I did do right (so far) was that flat brass weather stripping. I gave it little hope of working. But dang between the storm and that stripping that window is air tight even in the meets and corners. I was glad the sashes weren't too tight to begin with, that allows the brass to keep some spring under the wood.
 

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Bob Reynolds

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Beautiful Victorian and nice job so far.

I would pop the trim back off and stuff fiberglass insulation in the space under the trim, being careful not to disrupt the operation of the counter weights. If you can't get insulation stuffed in the space then you might staple a vapor barrier in the area that the insulation won't go. Then reattach the trim. Painter's putty the nail holes and caulk the gaps between the trim. Then paint a finish coat on the trim. Should look great and stop the air infiltration.
 

bud16415

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Your work looks very nice. You will want to follow the steps to get the inside sealed up a little better and depending on how well the storms fit you may want to weather strip them as well.
 

rokosz

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I know I'm not taking the boards off the pictured window, but 2 isn't far enough along that I can't take off one of the boards to see whats happening. The plaster walls were gone before my time, which probably means some caulk between trim board and drywall I'm hesitant to invade anymore than I'm doing, but I'll pop one trim off to see what things look like.
And, I think I know why the chicken-foot gap in the first picture is so large: that arc on the filler end is up against the flat mitre cut of the stop -- if that were just a teensy bit concave, it probably would allow a flat sit. I really gotta get more patient _and_ take pictures, these close ups are useful. I've considered putting something on the storm edges -- but they're so snug its not such a high priority. I use a rubber mallet to tap them into their openings. no raw wood rubs yet, just paint rubs. Thanks for all the ideas.
 

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