The door frame is 32 inches wide ...

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tomtheelder2020

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... which, of course, the exact width of a new door.* After I figure out a 7-foot straight edge, how much should I cut off? Is 1/4 inch enough?

*Glad I checked this before I made hinge mortises!
 

Snoonyb

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Wouldn't have made a difference anyway, as you never trim the hinge side, always the latch side, and 1/4 off with a block plane, should suffice.
 

tomtheelder2020

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... you never trim the hinge side, always the latch side.
Why is that? If it is based on that edge having a bevel, this door doesn't. I looked into that beforfe purchase. it is a masonite interior door from Home Depot. The website description doesn't say anything about a bevel and both sides measure the same (though I am not sure a 2-degree bevel would make a difference measurable with a tape). This door also comes with the lockset bores so trimming that side would not be my first choice.
 

Snoonyb

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I'd return the door, and exchange for a plain model, that, I, select where the latching devise is mounted.

The frame that the masonite is glued to is a specific dimension, so reducing that can affect how well/and long the hinge screws hold the hinges securely in place.

Hanging/setting a door is a carpentry skill, the product MFG. and retailer, are not carpenters.
 

Jeff Handy

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The latch side needs to be beveled, to remove the material that is in the way, without creating a huge gap when the door shuts.
Pre-hung doors come with a bevel, slab doors usually do not, in my experience.
You can trim the latch side with a table saw.
Or mark it well and trim it with a belt sander.
Or clamp a straight edge and cut with circular saw.
Or use a power planer.
A saw tends to chew up the surface on one side.
 

tomtheelder2020

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The latch side needs to be beveled, to remove the material that is in the way, without creating a huge gap when the door shuts.
Using my speed square as a depth gauge, it looks like the door jamb has a slight bevel (widening away from the stop). Is that something that might have been done in 1951? That seems like it would be a lot more difficult than beveling the door.

Pre-hung doors come with a bevel, slab doors usually do not, in my experience.
Mine is a Masonite slab with lockset bores and mortise already done so I am reluctant to trim anything from that side. Still, if my calculation is correct, trimming only enough for a 2-degree bevel means a cut depth of 3/64 (rounded up) from the side that will hit the stop. If I do trim just enough for the bevel. That is pretty precise work by any method but the table saw seems like my best shot at doing it accurately and that also lets me use a zero clearance insert to minimize tear-out.

Trimming only enough for the bevel still leaves the door too wide. This door is between kitchen and laundry room, with stop on kitchen side, so any gap will be seen only from laundry room. Since it appears there is a slight bevel on the jamb (1/32?) My thought is to first trim 3/16 from the hinge side, mortise and mount the hinges, then do a test fit. If it is still too tight I can then try the 2-degree bevel. Does that sound reasonable?
 

Jeff Handy

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Sounds like a decent plan.
Pros on here might have some more hints.
I have seen slab doors installed by lazy amateurs (and even lazy pros) where they did not bevel, and did not even mortise the hinges, they just let them stick out proud.
If the door is trimmed enough this will work, but it makes for a drafty seal, and also lets noise and light in around the jambs.
 

havasu

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I'd pop the trim, pull the door frame and replace with new door with jambs.
 

mabloodhound

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Just trim the hinge side of the door, you do NOT need a new frame. I always put a bevel on the hinge side also, so they won't become hinge bound. There is plenty of solid wood in the door edge to trim the 1/4" off.
 

tomtheelder2020

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Just trim the hinge side of the door, you do NOT need a new frame. I always put a bevel on the hinge side also, so they won't become hinge bound. There is plenty of solid wood in the door edge to trim the 1/4" off.
Replacing the frame (presumably sized for a 32 inch slab door) seems like overkill. I took 3/16 off the hinge side and a "dry fit" seems like it will work. I am going to paint the whole thing before making the hinge mortises so it will probably be Wednesday before I try hanging it.
 

Eddie_T

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I used no-mortise hinges throughout my house. I noticed that my retired master builder friend used them (at least on his pantry door) in his $1.6 million house. They give just the right amount of hinge side clearance.

Screenshot 2021-10-04 11.11.05 AM.png
 

tomtheelder2020

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I used no-mortise hinges throughout my house. I noticed that my retired master builder friend used them (at least on his pantry door) in his $1.6 million house. They give just the right amount of hinge side clearance.
This is a great idea. However, in this case the frame is already mortised for the old hinges.
 

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