Uneven drywall for trim

Discussion in 'Walls and Ceilings' started by robertn84, Jan 28, 2017.

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  1. Jan 28, 2017 #1

    robertn84

    robertn84

    robertn84

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    I have this really annoying problem around a few windows and a door frame I installed. Due to the way the drywaller hung the drywall, there are uneven parts that a normal piece of trim will not fix. I have attached pictures.

    On one window, on the top, the sheetrock extends beyond the jam 1/2 inch. However on the side of that window, there is a part where the drywall is flush with the jam. It's nuts. (I didn't do the drywall myself).

    Any thoughts or tips? Or is it just a matter of custom fitting each piece of trim around it?

    File_003.jpg

    File_002.jpg
     
  2. Jan 28, 2017 #2

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    The most aesthetically appealing solution would be to build the jamb out, and the heal of the casing to create a level plane.

    The material is available in the molding section of the big boxes.
     
  3. Jan 28, 2017 #3

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

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    I trim the window or door true to the part of the wall that sticks out the most. If you need to extend the jam I do that as mentioned above. There will then be a gap under some of the trim. I take plaster or drywall mud and fill in the gap behind the trim flush with the edge and then paint what I filled to match the wall and the edge of the trim the trim color. You will hardly notice it when it is done this way.

    It is very common in old houses and remodel work of old houses. If this was all new construction I would complain.
     
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  4. Jan 29, 2017 #4

    beachguy005

    beachguy005

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    I would get a drywall rasp and shave and bevel down the protruding edges. It's easier than having to add extensions or partial extensions. Depending on the trim you're using it will have a slight inward pitch but won't be that noticeable and the trim will cover the beveled drywall.
     

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