using joint compound for decorative effect

Discussion in 'Decorating and Design' started by jjm, Jul 28, 2009.

  1. Jul 28, 2009 #1

    jjm

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    Has anyone used joint compound for adding textured decorative effects...to make a wall look sort of Tuscan....and then painted over it for the full color effect?

    I saw a video on YouTube and it looked fairly easy; plus it's cheaper then textured paint. I don't mind adding the compound and then painting/glazing over it.

    If anyone's had any experience, pass along any pointers. I want to redo the bathroom walls and thought this would be a more interesting and easer option than tiling.

    Thanks
     
  2. Jul 28, 2009 #2

    Nestor_Kelebay

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    If you're going to be painting a bathroom with this, be certain to use a paint specifically meant for bathrooms like Zinsser's PermaWhite Bathroom Paint available at Home Depot.

    The reason why is that bathroom paints will have mildewcides in them that are highly soluble in water. It's the high affinity between the mildewcides in the paint and the moisture on the walls that causes those mildewcides to actually migrate through the paint film to the surface of the paint where they kill any mildewcide spores that land on the paint before they have a chance to grow.

    Personally, I think flat is beautiful. Flat walls are easier to clean, easier to paint and easier to repair. Why not just settle for a good looking paint job in your bathroom, why does it have to be a wall that's gonna be hard to fix, hard to clean and hard to paint. And, what are you gonna do if you don't like the results? Take it off? That ain't gonna be easy.

    So, if you do go ahead with this, also be certain to use a TOPPING or FINISHING drywall joint compound. These will have less glue in them than a regular or taping compound, so they don't dry as hard and would hopefully be easier to scrape off the wall in future.

    I say that because if you hang around these forums, the average is about 10 people wanting to get texture off their walls and ceilings for every one wanting to put it on.

    The other thing is if you ever want to sell this house in future, texture is gonna be seen by most people as a lot of work to remove, and suspicious to boot. It's the very first thing a homeowner's gonna to do to hide a lousy drywall repair. Bury it under texture.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2009
  3. Jul 28, 2009 #3

    jjm

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    Thanks for the suggestions/cautions, Nestor. Flat may be beautiful, but I'm in a fixer-upper 80s style condo that's been occupied mostly by college students in recent years. The bathroom walls have lots of dings and stuff...so smooth walls aren't a real option. Tile is one way to go, but lots of people (myself included) think a Tuscan/stucco style look would be a great permanent option for something different and unique. Got lousy walls? Make lemonade from lemons philosophy and do something different. I'm not thinking gaudy, messy peaks....more of an artistic look that will take some time to accomplish. I'll try it with one bathroom first. I guess there are those of us who wished we lived in an old Italian villa/farm house....and want to duplicate that look. :)
     
  4. Sep 6, 2009 #4

    mcmind

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    Not everyone is going to be suspicious about textured walls. Besides, honestly, who cares. This is your house, when you bought it you knew it had issues and problems you wanted to correct or improve. I say go for it. While you are living in your house, make it your house and don't worry about the next creative soul that will occupy it someday in the unknown future. Just like you, they will see a home that needs changed or improved to make it theirs.
     
  5. Sep 8, 2009 #5

    KatyE

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    I actually have done this. It was in my daughter's room, and we had three different wall surfaces when I tore the wallpaper off, so it was either new drywall or this.
    It's very easy--if I can do it, anyone can! I just smeared the stuff willy-nilly all over the walls, and when I had a small section (about 4' wide, ceiling to floor) covered, I looked it over and made adjustments to the texture. I didn't get too fussy about it, though, and I think that made it better. It will look different depending on what width putty knife you use. If you're going for the Tuscan look, I'd try to avoid too many curves and use a wider knife. When you're happy with the look, let it dry for a couple of days. Then roll over it with the lighter color. The next day, mix your darker color with the glaze, and take a stack of lint-free rags, and just dip one in the glaze and wipe it over the walls. You'll have to watch for drips, as they can happen several minutes after you've wiped the glaze on, since it gets caught on the texture, then settles enough to drip.
    One thing I would recommend is to get a board, probably about 4'x4' and practice--not so much for the technique as to make sure that you like the colors. When I first did this, the room was to be a guest room, and I painted it a sort of barn red, with a darker red glaze, and it was lovely. But when my daughter was born, I wanted to do pink. Unfortunately, I didn't pick the right shades, and it looks too cotton candyish for my taste. I wish I had tested it.
    Also, make sure you only mix as much glaze as you need. The first time, I dumped the whole pint of paint into the whole gallon of glaze, and I now have over half a gallon of dark red glaze that I may never use, whereas I would probably be able to make use of plain glaze with some other project. But then, I'm sorta thrifty, so those things bother me!
    Good luck with your project!
     
  6. Sep 21, 2009 #6

    kbender

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    KatyE, Thank you for your post. Did you use the premixed joint compound? If so, did you thin it down with water?

    I also love the idea of the 'Tuscan look' and started my project last week. I am ready to begin texturing and really appreciated coming across your information during my research.
     
  7. Sep 22, 2009 #7

    KatyE

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    Yes, I used a big bucket of premixed joint compound, and no, I did not thin it out. You'll go through a ton of it, so be prepared. It's pretty fun when you get into it, though.
    I usually have more questions than answers, so I'm glad I could help!:)
     
  8. Oct 17, 2009 #8

    jjm

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    Wow! Great instructions/suggestions. Thank you, everyone. I'm going to use the topping/finishing joint compound first suggested and keep in mind Nestor's suggestions for paint in the bathrooms. Now that the family members who have been temporarily living with us will be moving in the near future, I look forward to starting this project. If anyone has pictures to share of their projects, please share. It might be a few months before I finish mine, but if I can find a way to share a photo I will.
     
  9. Oct 19, 2010 #9

    rnddude

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    I did this in my wife's retail store. I troweled it on and created a rustic pattern. Then I put a base color down. Later, I did an overlay effect by using a darker stain, brushed on and immediately ragged off. The stain stayed dark in the nooks and crannies, lighter on the higher, smoother surfaces. Got a ton of compliments for the look.
     
  10. Aug 28, 2012 #10

    decor8

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    I was at a beautiful restored home yesterday where they had the most interesting walls. They told me that they used 8 to 10 layers of paint and some joint compound. Then they somehow pressed shells and ferns so that the impression was slightly raised when they were removed. Does anyone know how to do this technique or do you know what it is called?
     
  11. Aug 28, 2012 #11

    rnddude

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    decor...I am familiar with the technique. It is familiar to the one done to put patterns in concrete. In that method they use a flexible sheet, sort of a rubber material, that has the pattern cast into it in reverse. That sheet is positioned on the fresh trowelled concrete and then backed with plywood or such and then enough weight is added to press the pattern into the concrete. Then the sheet is moved to the next clean position and repeated. Those patterened sheets are available pre-made. However, if you want to do your own custom patern, you could lay the objects you want in your pattern into a small frame and then pour a flexible material (RTV?) over it to create your pattern sheet, then use as described above.
     
  12. Aug 28, 2012 #12

    decor8

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    Thank you for your quick reply. Do you know where I could purchase the materials that you mentioned? Thanks.
     
  13. Aug 29, 2012 #13

    rnddude

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    Not ofhand, but the interned search function is your friend....
     
  14. Aug 30, 2012 #14

    nealtw

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